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Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Virtual vandalism
Le Corbusier’s modernist masterpiece Villa Savoye vandalized with graffiti, its windows smashed? Thankfully, it’s only a virtual attack by Brussels-based artist Xavier Delory.

Alice through the theater curtains
A 1932 production of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland literally brought the original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel to life. See for yourself in the Museum of the City of New York blog. (Incidentally, Artstor has 48,000 images from MCNY, with lots more on the way.)

This is what happens when the model won’t stand still
Evidently, artists throughout history have always gotten their depictions of how people run wrong.

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artstor_logo_rgbArtstor is collaborating with the Harvard Art Museums to release 1,500 images in the Digital Library from the permanent collections of the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum.

The Harvard Art Museums have internationally renowned collections, which are among the largest art museum collections in the United States. Together, the collections of the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum consist of approximately 250,000 objects dating from ancient times to the present, including objects from the Americas, Europe, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Asia, across a variety of media. Continue Reading »

artstor_logo_rgbArtstor and the Davison Art Center at Wesleyan University are collaborating to release more than 15,000 images of prints and photographs from the Center’s permanent collection in the Digital Library. A selection of these images will also be made available in Artstor’s Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program.

The Davison Art Center (DAC) collection consists of some 24,000 works of art on paper, mostly original prints and photographs, with smaller numbers of works in other media. The print collection is considered to be one of the most important at any American university. It includes fine impressions of works by Dürer and Northern and Italian Renaissance artists; Rembrandt and his contemporaries; Goya; nineteenth-century French painter-printmakers such as Manet and Millet; American modern and contemporary artists; and Japanese ukiyo-e woodcuts. The DAC’s photographs range from calotypes and daguerreotypes made in the 1840s, to work by later photographers such as Lewis Hine and Berenice Abbott, to images by contemporary artists including Duane Michals and Cindy Sherman. Continue Reading »

Artstor and Lafayette College are collaborating to release over 300 images in the Digital Library from the Experimental Printmaking Institute.

artstor_logo_rgbThe Experimental Printmaking Institute (EPI) at Lafayette College is a unique printmaking laboratory that enables students to work hand in hand with professional artists using traditional techniques in concert with experimental approaches. For almost 20 years, EPI has produced editions by artists such as Faith Ringgold, Richard Anuszkiewicz, David Driskell, Grace Hartigan, and Sam Gilliam. The results of these collaborations are included in the permanent collections of many important museums, colleges, and universities. EPI partnered with Lafayette College’s Digital Scholarship Services (DSS) department to digitize and catalog its collection. Continue Reading »

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Can’t help doodling
As major doodlers ourselves (mostly during meetings), we are fascinated by anything that justifies our habit. Check out why researchers think that doodling may be a kind of language and may be hardwired into humans.

“New” Rembrandts
The Rembrandt Research Project says 70 paintings, many of them attributed to Rembrandt followers, are actually the work of the master.

Titian the entertainer
Yes, there are historical interpretations, yes, there are textual readings, yes, there is formal analysis, but sometimes we love art simply because it’s beautiful. In defense of art as escapism, using Titian’s Danaë as an example. (Incidentally, the Artstor Digital Library boasts more variations of the painting.)

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Gustav Klimt, Burgtheater (Vienna, Austria); Death of Romeo and Juliet, 1884-1887. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com

Gustav Klimt, Burgtheater (Vienna, Austria); Death of Romeo and Juliet, 1884-1887. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com

Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

Shakespeare: Text and Performance
Julia Reinhard Lupton, Professor, English, University of California, Irvine
This curriculum guide focuses on three plays: Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, and Cymbeline. The reading list covers three genres (tragedy, comedy, romance) and leads from very familiar to less familiar works by Shakespeare. I use Artstor images to build out Shakespeare’s world and the worlds depicted in the plays; to explore themes from mythology and literature drawn on in these plays; to provide insight into subsequent stage history; and to inspire students’ own scenographic imaginations.

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Byron Company, New York Association for the Blind, Two Children at Table, 1933. Museum of the City of New York

When I was a child in the mere single digits, my family sat down to a Twilight Zone marathon. It was my first time watching the show, and I was introduced to aliens, pig people, post-apocalyptic towns, and, most frightening of all, dolls that came to life.

It was the ventriloquist dummy and the chatty doll that gave me nightmares. Just remembering the line “My name is Talky Tina and I don’t think I like you” still gives me shivers. There’s something about those inanimate objects with their stiff movements, glassy eyes, and blank faces that creeps me out.

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