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Raphael | School of Athens | circa 1510-1512 | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

Raphael | School of Athens | circa 1510-1512 | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

Winners will receive five years’ free use of Shared Shelf cloud-based asset management tool

Artstor is proud to announce the inception of the Digital Humanities Awards to recognize and help facilitate the most innovative and intellectually stimulating projects in the field. This award recognizes the importance of the Digital Humanities and supports Artstor’s mission to enhance scholarship and teaching through the use of digital media.  The award of five years’ free access to Shared Shelf to winners helps to address the need recently identified in Ithaka S+R’s Sustaining the Digital Humanities “for an end-to-end solution… to support faculty from planning, to building, to preservation and outreach.”

To enter, describe your Digital Humanities project in 1,000 words or less, and your team could receive full, long-term access to Artstor’s Shared Shelf digital media management software to upload, catalog, manage, store, and share the project. Learn more about the award at artstor.org/dha.

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Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Say cheese!

An investigation into why we so seldomly see people smiling in painted portraits.

DIY apocalypse

A different angle in which to see Albrecht Dürer: self-publishing pioneer.

Undead photos

Artist uses historic archival photographs from the Library of Congress to create funny—and sometimes creepy—animated GIFs.

And we were torn about this one: the cute and horrifying tableaux of an amateur Victorian taxidermist.

Better than the waiting room

A visit to a museum dedicated to art and medical objects in St. John’s Hospital in Bruges.

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Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.;www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; http://www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

“Was this the face that launched a thousand ships?”

So asks the title character in Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus upon seeing the radiant ghost of Helen of Troy. Marlowe was not the only artist to be captivated by Helen and her fabled beauty. Indeed, for millennia, painters, sculptors, poets and playwrights have been inspired by her story.

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Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Bon appétit

Just in time for lunch: The New York Public Library has scanned more than 17,000 menus from 1851 to 2008.

Abstraction avant la lettre

Cross-hatched engravings found in a cave in Gibraltar are being called the first known examples of Neanderthal rock art by scientists who studied the site.

Too hot

A masterpiece by Raphael was warped by faulty air conditioning.

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Jacob Lawrence, The Migration of the Negro Panel no. 3: In every town Negroes were leaving by the hundreds to go North and enter into Northern industry, 1940 – 1941. Image and original data provided by The Phillips Collection, © 2005 Estate of Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Jacob Lawrence, The Migration of the Negro Panel no. 3: In every town Negroes were leaving by the hundreds to go North and enter into Northern industry, 1940 – 1941. Image and original data provided by The Phillips Collection, © 2005 Estate of Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Jacob Lawrence painted “The Migration of the Negro,” a series of 60 small panels describing the passage of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North, in 1940 and 1941. The works combined the vibrancy of modernism, the content of history painting, and the urgency of political art. The electrifying results catapulted the young artist into fame and the history books.

Lawrence saw the series as a single work, but a year after its completion the Museum of Modern Art acquired the even-numbered pictures and the Phillips Collection in Washington the others, and opportunities to see all the paintings together have been rare. Which is a pity. As art critic Holland Cotter wrote in The New York Times“…only in the complete series can we fully grasp the sinewy moral texture of art that is in the business of neither easy uplift nor single-minded protest.”

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Wurts Bros. , New York Public Library Picture Collection, Miss Javitz, Miss Louise Riley, and Naomi Street helping customers to select prints, 1949. Museum of the City of New York

Wurts Bros. , New York Public Library Picture Collection, Miss Javitz, Miss Louise Riley, and Naomi Street helping customers to select prints, 1949. Museum of the City of New York

Start the school year off right by registering for a free Artstor Digital Library account. Among the many benefits: you can organize images into groupsexport these groups as PowerPoint presentations or download them in zipped files, share them with other users at your institution, add searchable annotations to individual images, and access the Digital Library away from campus or on your mobile devices.

To register, simply visit library.artstor.org from your institution, click on Register on the upper right corner, and fill out the required fields. You’re done! Now you can log in from anywhere. Remember: You will need to log in to your registered user account at your subscribing institution once every 120 days to maintain your remote access.

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

This week brought us one surprising revelation after another:

A Robert Rauschenberg artwork led to the solving of a decades-old murder mystery.

Using the position of the sun and the time of high tide, an astrophysicist pinpointed the birth of Impressionism to the nearest minute.

Researchers discovered buried evidence of more than 15 late Neolithic monuments around Stonehenge.

Apparently, drawings can predict how intelligent a 4-year old will be ten years later.

And this sent shockwaves around the office: Hello Kitty is not a cat.

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