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Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D'Arthur; "La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard", 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D’Arthur; “La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard”, 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley was born on August 21, 1872. Despite dying of tuberculosis at the young age of twenty-five in 1898, the artist managed to have a brilliant career full of controversy and scandal. He shot to fame with his illustrations for Thomas Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur in 1893, and then became notorious for his illustrations for Oscar Wilde’s Salome (1894).

Recurring images throughout his career follow two seemingly incongruous paths. There is an emphasis on sly, clever wickedness; a youthful disregard for propriety; and an interest in the perverse and profane. Overlapping imagery of melancholia and death lead the second path. These two broad and inconsistent currents each render distinct images of the same artist who was drawn to scandal and associated himself with the 1890s Symbolist crowd often scorned by the arts elite and general public alike.

The images in this post come from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and George Eastman House collections in the Artstor Digital Library.

Elizabeth Darocha Berenz

Often, it is the unconventional details that lend a building its sense of character. This is certainly true of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, a monument striking for its tilt of approximately 4 degrees.

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Bonanno Pisano, Campanile (Leaning Tower), exterior, 1174-1350, Pisa, Italy. (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com, scalarchives.com

The tilt was even more pronounced before modern efforts at stabilization began, and by some accounts has reached 8-10 degrees in past centuries. But while stabilizing the tower has been important to its physical preservation, it may have negatively affected the church’s historical legacy. Since the Leaning Tower of Pisa was straightened out, several other buildings–mainly in Germany and Switzerland–have been vying for the slanted spotlight, as was humorously reported by the New York Times in 2012.

However, no attempt at dethroning Pisa as home to the farthest leaning building has been as bold as that of Abu Dhabi, the capital city of the United Arab Emirates. Starting in 2007, the city began work on the Capital Gate, which rises at an 18-degree westward lean–more than four times that of the Leaning Tower of Pisa–along the city’s waterfront.

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Oliverio Toscani, Double Portrait of Andy Warhol, 1974, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Photo © MFAH, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Oliverio Toscani, Double Portrait of Andy Warhol, 1974, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Photo © MFAH, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Artstor and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston have released more than 5,000 images from the permanent collection in the Digital Library.

The images in this release include works by artists such as Diane Arbus, Alexander Archipenko, Robert Arneson, Uta Barth, George Condo, Delacroix, Dan Graham, William Klein, Dorothea Lange, Annie Leibovitz, Roy Lichenstein, Brice Marden, Claes Oldenburg, José Clemente Orozco, Irving Penn, José Guadalupe Posada, Frederic Remington, Gerhard Richter, Diego Rivera, Milton Rogovin, Ed Ruscha, Andres Serrano, Jennifer Steinkamp, Rufino Tamayo, James Turrell, Peter Voulkos, Joel Peter Witkin, Minor White, Rachel Whiteread, Frank Lloyd Wright, and many more.

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Friday links

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

Andy Warhol’s silver screen

Warhol made hundreds of 16mm films, but many are virtually unknown because of their fragility and the difficulty of projecting them. Now the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and the Museum of Modern Art are digitizing nearly 1,000 of them.

“Occupation: artist”

Jackson Pollock’s passport reveals a little-known fact about the famed painter: “right index finger partly missing.”

De humani corporis fabrica

The University of Toronto’s Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library is celebrating the 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius, the anatomist whose illustrated book revolutionized renaissance medicine. (You can see 253 of the woodcuts in Northwestern University’s Vesalius Anatomical Illustrations collection in Artstor.)

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Dasavatara temple; South jangha, rathikabimba, detail, ca 500-525 CE | Deogarh, Lalitpur, Uttar Pradesh, India | Image and original data provided by American Institute of Indian Studies

Artstor has launched more than 1,300 additional images of art and architecture in India from The American Institute of Indian Studies (AIIS) in the Digital Library. More than 64,000 images are now available documenting a range of visual traditions from South Asian art, including stone, metal, and terracotta sculpture, numismatics, painting, manuscripts and miniature paintings, as well as Buddhist, Jain, Hindu, and Islamic architecture from all over India. These images have been selected from the AIIS Photo Archive, which is housed in the Center for Art and Archaeology in Gurgaon, Haryana, India.

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Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah's Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah’s Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Artstor and the J. Paul Getty Museum have released more than 5,000 images from the museum’s Open Content Program in the Digital Library.

The Getty’s Open Content Program makes available digital images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the public domain. Among the images now available in the Digital Library are works from the Museum’s permanent collection by artists such as Albrecht Altdorfer, Bronzino, Dürer, Alfred Stieglitz, Andrea del Sarto, Mantegna, Anthony van Dyck, Rodin, Pissarro, Canaletto, Caspar David Friedrich, Monet, Walker Evans, Correggio, Van Gogh, Titian, Tina Modotti, Gainsborough, Thomas Eakins, Théodore Géricault, Rembrandt, Raphael, Pontormo, Pieter de Hooch, Rubens, Gauguin, Cézanne, Parmigianino, Veronese, Poussin, Nadar, Lucas Cranach, Da Vinci, Julia Margaret Cameron, Fragonard, Watteau, Jacques-Louis David, Courbet, Klimt, Tiepolo, Vasari, Seurat, Goya, Delacroix, El Greco, Degas, and many more.

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St George of the Greeks; Interior apses and vaulting, 14th century. Famagusta (Ammochostos, Gazimagusa), northern Cyprus. Allan Langdale Digital Archive of Cypriot Art and Architecture. © Allan Langdale 2008 .

St George of the Greeks; Interior apses and vaulting, 14th century. Famagusta (Ammochostos, Gazimagusa), northern Cyprus. Allan Langdale Digital Archive of Cypriot Art and Architecture. © Allan Langdale 2008 .

Artstor has collaborated with Allan Langdale to share nearly 3,000 additional images of the historical architecture and landscape of Cyprus and of world art and architecture.

The images capture sites in Cyprus, Albania, Italy, Croatia, Romania, Georgia, Bulgaria, Turkey, and Montenegro, and join Langdale’s 3,350 images of architecture and archaeological sites of northern Cyprus previously available in the Digital Library.

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