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NewArtstor has released the latest version of its Offline Image Viewer (OIV).

OIV enables instructors to give classroom presentations using larger images from the Artstor Digital Library (up to 3200 pixels wide) along with local content without being connected to the Internet. You can create digital slide show presentations that feature side-by-side comparisons, zooming and panning, and the ability to customize text on the slides.

OIV 4.0 includes the following new features:

  • Compatible with Mac OS X 10.9 and Windows 8.
  • Link to image viewer – clicking the link to image viewer icon on an image will open that image in the image viewer within the Digital Library.
  • Embedded hyperlinks – you can now embed hyperlinks in your OIV slides.
  • Saving to legacy format—this version of OIV allows presentations to be saved in OIV 2.6 format so that they can be opened by OIV version 2.6 and above (without image viewer linking functionality). This version can also open OIV 3.X files.

A bug that was affecting dual-screen presentations has also been fixed.

To install OIV 4.0, first uninstall any previous version, log into your account, and follow the directions on our Help site.

Wurts Bros., Display of medals and coins, ca. 1900 (detail). Museum of the City of New York; mcny.org

Wurts Bros., Display of medals and coins, ca. 1900 (detail). Museum of the City of New York; mcny.org

The deadline for Artstor’s new initiative to preserve and increase the availability of at-risk collections of individual scholars has been extended to November 15.

What it is
Artstor will provide modest financial support to digitize and catalog selected at-risk collections. We will then maintain the collections and make them available through the Artstor Digital Library and open access initiatives such as the Digital Public Library of America.

We will also offer access to our Shared Shelf tools to support the cataloging of these collections, and can provide the data and images back to the contributor in a structured format for those who wish to utilize the resulting content in other systems.

Continue Reading »

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Doodle books
We’ve confessed our love of doodling in a previous link roundup, so we were of course excited to run into these two items: An exhibition at the Cambridge University Library featuring books with inscriptions, scribbles, and doodles, and doodles in some of the world’s oldest books as cataloged by medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel.

Speed limits in museums
The average museum visitor spends only 15 to 30 seconds in front of a work of art. What happens if you slow down and look at an artwork for 20 minutes?

DIY archaeology
This one made us snort laugh. An amateur finds what he presumes to be a fragment of a stone relief from an ancient Roman fort and comes up with a creative recreation of the full work.

Continue Reading »

Artstor’s informative webinars are available for everyone, from those considering a subscription to experienced users.

The schedule below is separated into two sections: It begins with the Artstor Digital Library and is followed by Shared Shelf.

ARTSTOR DIGITAL LIBRARY

Intro to the Artstor Digital Library – finding images
Learn the ins and outs of keyword search, browsing by media, collection, or geography, advanced search, filtered results, and more.
November 3,  11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EST Register now

Comprehensive introduction to the Artstor Digital Library 
Learn everything the Artstor Digital Library has to offer, from collections to tools and resources.
November 4,  3:00 PM EST Register now

Continue Reading »

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

Virtual vandalism
Le Corbusier’s modernist masterpiece Villa Savoye vandalized with graffiti, its windows smashed? Thankfully, it’s only a virtual attack by Brussels-based artist Xavier Delory.

Alice through the theater curtains
A 1932 production of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland literally brought the original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel to life. See for yourself in the Museum of the City of New York blog. (Incidentally, Artstor has 48,000 images from MCNY, with lots more on the way.)

This is what happens when the model won’t stand still
Evidently, artists throughout history have always gotten their depictions of how people run wrong.

Continue Reading »

artstor_logo_rgbArtstor is collaborating with the Harvard Art Museums to release 1,500 images in the Digital Library from the permanent collections of the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum.

The Harvard Art Museums have internationally renowned collections, which are among the largest art museum collections in the United States. Together, the collections of the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum consist of approximately 250,000 objects dating from ancient times to the present, including objects from the Americas, Europe, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Asia, across a variety of media. Continue Reading »

artstor_logo_rgbArtstor and the Davison Art Center at Wesleyan University are collaborating to release more than 15,000 images of prints and photographs from the Center’s permanent collection in the Digital Library. A selection of these images will also be made available in Artstor’s Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program.

The Davison Art Center (DAC) collection consists of some 24,000 works of art on paper, mostly original prints and photographs, with smaller numbers of works in other media. The print collection is considered to be one of the most important at any American university. It includes fine impressions of works by Dürer and Northern and Italian Renaissance artists; Rembrandt and his contemporaries; Goya; nineteenth-century French painter-printmakers such as Manet and Millet; American modern and contemporary artists; and Japanese ukiyo-e woodcuts. The DAC’s photographs range from calotypes and daguerreotypes made in the 1840s, to work by later photographers such as Lewis Hine and Berenice Abbott, to images by contemporary artists including Duane Michals and Cindy Sherman. Continue Reading »

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