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Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Here are some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

The woman behind the rabbit

The works of Beatrix Potter, author of The Tale of Peter Rabbit and one of the most successful writers of all time, recently came into the public domain in many countries around the world. The Public Domain Review explores the complex woman behind the warm-hearted stories.

Ice cream with an abstractionist

New York School painter Ad Reinhardt, principally known for his ascetic black monochromes, was also the creative director for trade magazine Ice Cream Field. The Smithsonian Institute’s Archives of American Arts shares one of his light-hearted covers. Continue Reading »

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Jacques-Louis David | The Oath of the Horatii | 1784 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Through a collaboration with the Réunion des Musées Nationaux (RMN) and Art Resource, Artstor will share nearly 7,000 additional images of works in the permanent collections of French national and regional museums in the Digital Library. This will bring the total of RMN images in the Digital Library to more than 14,000. The images will be selected from the archives of the Agence photographique de la RMN, which include the collections of 28 museums, including the Musée du Louvre, the Musée d’Orsay, and the Musée National d’Art Moderne – Centre Georges Pompidou.

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logo-mauritshuisArtstor and Mauritshuis are collaborating to make available 1,200 images of works and their versos from the museum’s permanent collection.

The Mauritshuis is home to the very best of Dutch Golden Age painting. More than two hundred key works from Dutch and Flemish masters are on display in the intimate rooms of this seventeenth-century mansion in The Hague, ranging from such masterpieces as Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl EarringThe Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp by Rembrandt, and The Goldfinch by Carel Fabritius, to genre paintings by Jan Steen, landscapes by Jacob van Ruisdael, still lifes by Adriaen Coorte, and portraits by Rubens.

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On July 14, we celebrated the storming of the Bastille, the momentous day in 1789 that marked the beginning of the French Revolution, and the beginning of the end of the monarchy.

While it is a day revered by the citoyens of France, it has come to symbolize the declining fortunes of the king and his once celebrated and later reviled wife, Marie Antoinette.

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine | Photographer: Gérard Blot. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y. artres.com

History has revised the narrative of the Queen whose apocryphal utterance “let them eat cake” allegedly flaunted her disregard for her starving subjects.

Beginning with the nineteenth-century biography by the Goncourt brothers, and the insightful study of Zweig (1932), and culminating in recent portrayals, notably Coppola’s film of 2006, and Thomas’ chronicle of Marie Antoinette’s final days, Farewell, My Queen (published in 2003 and released as a film in 2012), characterizations of the monarch have softened and become more nuanced.

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dpla_logo3Artstor has collaborated with six institutions to provide access to nearly 35,000 additional high-quality images in the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). The release is part of an ongoing initiative; last year, Artstor also provided access in DPLA to more than 23,000 high-quality images from major American museums and universities.

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Albert Winslow Barker, Girl with basket, 1910 or 1916. Bryn Mawr College: Albert Winslow Barker Collection

Albert Winslow Barker, Girl with basket, 1910 or 1916. Bryn Mawr College: Albert Winslow Barker Collection

Bryn Mawr College’s Albert Winslow Barker Collection in Shared Shelf Commons brings back to light the work of an unfairly neglected American lithographer of the 1930s and uncovers his little-known photographs. And there is much to admire.

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Maurice Prendergast, Bastille Day; Le Quatorze Juillet, 1892. Image and data from The Cleveland Museum of Art

Maurice Prendergast, Bastille Day; Le Quatorze Juillet, 1892. Image and data from The Cleveland Museum of Art

No matter where you were in the U.S. this Fourth of July, you probably had the opportunity to enjoy the Independence Day fireworks. Next week will be the turn for our friends in France to enjoy their revolution celebration with fireworks. Bastille Day, or Le quatorze juillet, commemorates the storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789. The capture of the prison marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the end of Louis XVI’s absolute monarchy. Three years later the First Republic was born.

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