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Archive for the ‘African Art’ Category

Pueblo | Pottery water bottle | Santa Fe, New Mexico | Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (Harvard University); peabody.harvard.edu

Pueblo | Pottery water bottle | Santa Fe, New Mexico | Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (Harvard University); peabody.harvard.edu

Artstor Digital Library has collaborated with the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University to share 24,000 additional images of Pre-Columbian, African, Native North American, Oceanic, Asian, and European objects. This brings the current available total to more than 52,000 of a projected 154,000 images from the Museum’s collection.

The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University is the oldest museum devoted to anthropology in the United States and holds a permanent collection of millions of objects documenting the history of human culture throughout the Americas, Africa, Oceania, Asia, and Europe. The museum’s archaeological holdings comprise the majority of the permanent collection, with particular strengths in North, Central, and South America. Though smaller in number, the ethnographic collections have established the museum’s reputation as a preeminent repository of anthropological objects relating to Native American, Pre-Columbian, African, Oceanic, and Asian cultural groups. There are also extensive archival collections, which document the museum’s collections and history, as well as the development anthropology as an academic discipline. Selections from the museum’s permanent collection of archaeological objects, ethnographic artifacts, and archival materials will be added to the Artstor Digital Library for scholarly and educational uses. (more…)

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Joan Miró | Untitled | 1956 | Dickinson College: The Trout Gallery | © 2012 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Joan Miró | Untitled | 1956 | Dickinson College: The Trout Gallery | © 2012 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Artstor has collaborated with The Trout Gallery, the art museum at Dickinson College, to share more than 8,000 images of works in its permanent collection in the Digital Library.

The museum houses the college’s collection of art and anthropological artifacts, which spans ancient through contemporary periods. The collection comprises thousands of objects, with particular strengths in American and European prints from the 19th through 20th centuries, as well as photography, West African sculpture, Asian art, and Native American and Oceanic objects. (more…)

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Mochica | Vessel with sea lion and feline(?) |  A.D. 500-750 | Image © Princeton University Art Museum

Mochica | Vessel with sea lion and feline(?) | A.D. 500-750 | Image © Princeton University Art Museum

The Princeton University Art Museum and ARTstor are now sharing approximately 600 images from the museum’s encyclopedic collections in the Digital Library. This is the first release of an approximately 10,000 projected images.

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Water jar |1880 | United States | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Water jar |1880 | United States | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The ARTstor Digital Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston have collaborated to share more than 1,300 additional images of art and artifacts from the museum’s permanent collection.

This release includes photographs by Ansel Adams, Sugimoto Hiroshi, Man Ray, and Alfred Stieglitz; paintings by John Singleton Copley, Arthur Dove, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Joseph Stella; earthenware by SaraFina Gutierrez Tafoya and  Diego Romero; furniture by Charles Eames; dresses by Charles James and Geoffrey Beene; drawings by Silver Horn (Huangooah); and objects from the 5th century A.D. to the 20th century.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston houses a collection of 450,000 objects from around the world and across the ages. The Art of the Ancient World collection ranks among the premier encyclopedic collections in the world, representing more than 7,000 years of art from Nubia, Egypt, the Near East, Cyprus, Anatolia, Greece, and Italy. Also noteworthy are the museum’s holdings in Asian art, with works dating from 4,000 BC and encompassing Japanese, Chinese, and Indian painting and sculpture, Japanese prints and metalwork, and Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese ceramics. The American collections include Paul Revere’s silver, New England furniture, and a selection of paintings from all eras of America’s history.

For more detailed information about this collection, visit Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Collection page.

Related collections:

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Katsushika Hokusai | Drum Bridge at Tenjin Shrine, No. 7 from series Wondrous Views of Famous Bridges in All the Provinces | Smith College Museum of Art

Katsushika Hokusai | Drum Bridge at Tenjin Shrine, No. 7 from series Wondrous Views of Famous Bridges in All the Provinces | Smith College Museum of Art

ARTstor has collaborated with the Smith College Museum of Art to share an additional 4,900 images from the museum’s permanent collection, bringing the total to more than 8,000 images in the Digital Library. The Smith College Museum of Art has one of the nation’s finest teaching collections with approximately 22,000 objects. Encyclopedic in scope, the permanent collection has strengths in European and American art from the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as holdings in Asian, African, and Latin American art and Classical antiquities. Of particular note is the depth and quality of the museum’s collections of prints, drawings, and photographs, more than 17,000 of which are housed at the Cunningham Center for the Study of Prints, Drawings and Photographs.

The Smith College Museum of Art was founded with the Smith College in 1875. In 2003, the Brown Fine Arts Center — a complex housing the museum, as well as Smith College’s Department of Art and Hillyer Art Library — was renovated and expanded by Polshek Partnership. The Atrium of the Brown Fine Arts Center is decorated with a 43-foot long mural by Mexican artist Rufino Tamayo, “Nature and the Artist: The Work of Art and the Observer,” which was originally commissioned by the college in 1943.

View the collection in the Digital Library: http://library.artstor.org/library/collection/smith

For more detailed information about this collection, visit the Smith College Museum of Art page.

Related Collections:

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Unknown (Japanese) | Seki station, No. 48, Tokaido Road series | Indianapolis Museum of Art; imamuseum.org |Image © Indianapolis Museum of Art

Unknown (Japanese) | Seki station, No. 48, Tokaido Road series | Indianapolis Museum of Art; imamuseum.org |Image © Indianapolis Museum of Art

ARTstor and the Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) have collaborated to share more than 2,000 images from its encyclopedic permanent collection in the Digital Library. This is the second installment of a projected total of 10,000 images.
(more…)

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ARTstor is collaborating with the University of Florida to share more than 300 images from the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art.

The images consist of a selection of approximately 335 images of artworks representing the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art‘s five core collecting areas: African art, Asian art, modern art, contemporary art, and photography, as well as its holdings of Ancient American art, Oceanic art, and Prints and Drawings before 1850.
(more…)

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ARTstor is collaborating with the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum to share approximately 4,000 images from the permanent collection in the Digital Library.

The Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum is the only museum in the United States devoted exclusively to historic and contemporary design. The Museum presents compelling perspectives on the impact of design on daily life through active educational and curatorial programming.

The Museum’s diverse collection spans twenty four centuries of historic and contemporary design, including seventeenth-century Japanese tsuba, Parisian parasol designs, postmodern glassware, modular toys, and fabric about the future.
(more…)

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Navajo | Pin, round silver base set with 52 turquoise stones in 3 rows around a center stone | Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

ARTstor Digital Library has collaborated with the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University to share nearly 25,000 additional images of Pre-Columbian, African, Native North American, and Oceanic objects. This brings the current available total to more than 28,000 of a projected 154,000 images from the Museum’s collection. (more…)

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James Conlon | The Great Mosque of Djenne, South façade, exterior | image: 2008 | Djenne, Mali | for commercial use or publication, please contact: Media Center for Art History, Columbia University. Email: mediacenter at columbia dot

James Conlon | The Great Mosque of Djenne, South façade, exterior | image: 2008 | Djenne, Mali | for commercial use or publication, please contact: Media Center for Art History, Columbia University. Email: mediacenter at columbia dot edu

Mrs. Michelle Apotsos
Stanford University
Doctoral candidate Art History/Architectural History

As a graduate student at Tufts University, I was once given the opportunity to give a lecture to a class of architectural history students on West African architectural form for the purpose of unsettling some common notions that inform Western conceptions of the built environment. I decided to present a case study of the Djenné mosque in Mali, West Africa as an example of an architectural tradition that utilizes distinctive structures, materials, and iconographies to resonate with its cultural context. The experience itself not only revealed to me the inherent challenges of teaching architectural studies in Africa, but also the necessity of having high-quality visual tools in order to recreate a convincing three-dimensional spatial narrative. Thus began my ongoing love affair with the ARTstor Digital Library.

James Conlon | The potige (façade) of the typical Djenne house | Djenne, Mali | For commercial use or publication, please contact: Media Center for Art History, Columbia University. Email: mediacenter at columbia dot edu

James Conlon | The potige (façade) of the typical Djenne house | Djenne, Mali | For commercial use or publication, please contact: Media Center for Art History, Columbia University. Email: mediacenter at columbia dot edu

As a field of study, African architectural history is handicapped by both a lack of documentation and the ephemerality of most primary structural source materials. This causes many students within architectural studies to view the idea of an “African architecture” with inherent skepticism. But the reality of architecture in Africa is that it is both a dynamic medium and a deeply cultural process that provides us with a largely underutilized tool for analyzing the cultural conditions of a particular African context. I attempted to underscore this reality in my lecture by taking the students step by step through a historical, cultural, and stylistic narrative of the mosque, using images from the ARTstor Digital Library to provide the visual evidence for the conceptual theories being presented. Beginning with a systematic analysis of mosque’s faces and then moving into a more formal investigation of its geometric brickwork patterns and threshold ornamentation, I proceeded to trace the mosque’s stylistic lineage back to North African sources, specifically the ksour and kasbah structures of Southern Morocco. I then compared these formal elements to other regional Djennenke productions including masks, pottery, and other architectural forms, and in doing so managed to convey the presence of a distinctly regional style that captured the area’s social, cultural, and spiritual character within a number of architectural representations ranging from the stick-like toron that erupt from the mosque’s surface to the studded pinnacles that mimic both traditional Islamic defensive architecture and pre-Islamic ancestral pillars. At each stage of my analysis, the ARTstor Digital Library provided the visual tools necessary to present this structure within an appropriate conceptual framework.

The talk itself was so successful and the material so rich that it eventually formed the basis for my Master’s thesis, my doctoral dissertation, and the creation of an undergraduate seminar on West African Islamic architecture scheduled for 2013. In addition, the ARTstor Digital Library has inspired me in the course of my research to document not only as many buildings as possible, but also their various contexts in order to provide a comprehensive image base that can support a rigorous degree of academic analysis.

Barbara Anello | Ait Ben Haddou, image 2007 | Ain Ben Haddou, Morocco | Image and original data provided by Barbara Anello | Photographs © Barbara J. Anello

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