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Archive for the ‘Architecture & City Planning’ Category

Mosaics, central courtyard: Ulysses and Sirens, House of Dionysos and Ulysses, Mid 3rdc, Dougga, Tunisia. Data and image from William L. MacDonald Collection, Princeton University

Mosaics, central courtyard: Ulysses and Sirens, House of Dionysos and Ulysses, Mid 3rdc, Dougga, Tunisia. Data and image from William L. MacDonald Collection, Princeton University

Artstor and Princeton University have collaborated to release approximately 4,500 images of architecture from the archives of William L. MacDonald in the Digital Library.

The collection in the Artstor Digital Library documents the city of Rome in great depth, as well as ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman architecture, Byzantine and Baroque architecture, and American architecture. The photographs were taken by MacDonald over a period of more than 40 years and include sites that now are largely inaccessible and monuments that have permanently changed.

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Luigi Garzi, Bellarmine Chapel, dome fresco, Rome, Italy. John Pinto Collection (Princeton University)

Luigi Garzi, Bellarmine Chapel, dome fresco, Rome, Italy. John Pinto Collection (Princeton University)

Artstor and Princeton architectural historian John Pinto have collaborated to share approximately 2,000 images of Italian architecture, landscape, and urbanism in the Digital Library.

Pinto’s photographs document Renaissance and Baroque architecture, landscape architecture, and monuments, including Hadrian’s Villa and Trevi Fountain. These images trace Rome’s history as a center of artistic production through the ages.

John Pinto is the Howard Crosby Butler Memorial Professor of the History of Architecture in the Princeton University Department of Art and Archaeology and is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. (more…)

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Florentine, View of Florence with the Campanile and Duomo, Orsanmichele, and Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, Italy. © 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Florentine, View of Florence with the Campanile and Duomo, Orsanmichele, and Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, Italy. © 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

History of Architecture and Urbanism I
Amber Wiley, Visiting Assistant Professor, Architecture, Tulane University

This curriculum guide is global in focus, including both Western and non-Western developments, covering the time period from prehistory to the medieval era. The survey highlights a variety of aspects of the built environment such as architecture, urban settlements, and landscapes. Coursework investigates monumental civic architecture, religious structures, as well as domestic buildings, the urban form, and architectural theory. The guide utilizes architectural images to examine the ways that religious, political, and social structures were expressed through the melding of architecture and landscapes. Central to this architectural analysis is how different cultures and communities made meaning in their everyday lives through design, discussion on what architecture reveals about societal concerns and hierarchies, and the ways in which natural settings are exploited for sustenance and protection – generally speaking, how architecture can be viewed as a cultural product of a particular historical milieu.

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Often, it is the unconventional details that lend a building its sense of character. This is certainly true of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, a monument striking for its tilt of approximately 4 degrees.

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Bonanno Pisano, Campanile (Leaning Tower), exterior, 1174-1350, Pisa, Italy. (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com, scalarchives.com

The tilt was even more pronounced before modern efforts at stabilization began, and by some accounts has reached 8-10 degrees in past centuries. But while stabilizing the tower has been important to its physical preservation, it may have negatively affected the church’s historical legacy. Since the Leaning Tower of Pisa was straightened out, several other buildings–mainly in Germany and Switzerland–have been vying for the slanted spotlight, as was humorously reported by the New York Times in 2012.

However, no attempt at dethroning Pisa as home to the farthest leaning building has been as bold as that of Abu Dhabi, the capital city of the United Arab Emirates. Starting in 2007, the city began work on the Capital Gate, which rises at an 18-degree westward lean–more than four times that of the Leaning Tower of Pisa–along the city’s waterfront.

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Dasavatara temple; South jangha, rathikabimba, detail, ca 500-525 CE | Deogarh, Lalitpur, Uttar Pradesh, India | Image and original data provided by American Institute of Indian Studies

Artstor has launched more than 1,300 additional images of art and architecture in India from The American Institute of Indian Studies (AIIS) in the Digital Library. More than 64,000 images are now available documenting a range of visual traditions from South Asian art, including stone, metal, and terracotta sculpture, numismatics, painting, manuscripts and miniature paintings, as well as Buddhist, Jain, Hindu, and Islamic architecture from all over India. These images have been selected from the AIIS Photo Archive, which is housed in the Center for Art and Archaeology in Gurgaon, Haryana, India.

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St George of the Greeks; Interior apses and vaulting, 14th century. Famagusta (Ammochostos, Gazimagusa), northern Cyprus. Allan Langdale Digital Archive of Cypriot Art and Architecture. © Allan Langdale 2008 .

St George of the Greeks; Interior apses and vaulting, 14th century. Famagusta (Ammochostos, Gazimagusa), northern Cyprus. Allan Langdale Digital Archive of Cypriot Art and Architecture. © Allan Langdale 2008 .

Artstor has collaborated with Allan Langdale to share nearly 3,000 additional images of the historical architecture and landscape of Cyprus and of world art and architecture.

The images capture sites in Cyprus, Albania, Italy, Croatia, Romania, Georgia, Bulgaria, Turkey, and Montenegro, and join Langdale’s 3,350 images of architecture and archaeological sites of northern Cyprus previously available in the Digital Library.

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We invited Lee T. Pearcy of Bryn Mawr College’s Department of Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, to discuss the Classicizing Philadelphia project.

classic-philadelphia

One way to think about America’s relationship with ancient Greece and Rome is to imagine a dialogue. Listen carefully as you wander around Philadelphia. You may be able to hear the conversation. Girard College emulates the Parthenon. The Art Museum, with its Corinthian porticoes and classical pediments, talks to Rome, and the Doric Waterworks below it talks to Greece. At the Arch Street Theater in 1858, Ernst Legouvé’s Medea talked to Euripides, and in the 2006 Mummers’ Parade, the Aqua String Band consulted Rome before it went “Roman Up Broad.” For three hundred years, Philadelphia has generated part of its own special look and feel, its culture, through a conversation with ancient Greece and Rome.

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