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Archive for the ‘Architecture & City Planning’ Category

We invited Lee T. Pearcy of Bryn Mawr College’s Department of Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, to discuss the Classicizing Philadelphia project.

classic-philadelphia

One way to think about America’s relationship with ancient Greece and Rome is to imagine a dialogue. Listen carefully as you wander around Philadelphia. You may be able to hear the conversation. Girard College emulates the Parthenon. The Art Museum, with its Corinthian porticoes and classical pediments, talks to Rome, and the Doric Waterworks below it talks to Greece. At the Arch Street Theater in 1858, Ernst Legouvé’s Medea talked to Euripides, and in the 2006 Mummers’ Parade, the Aqua String Band consulted Rome before it went “Roman Up Broad.” For three hundred years, Philadelphia has generated part of its own special look and feel, its culture, through a conversation with ancient Greece and Rome.

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Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo | Social Housing; central walkway leads past three story building with colorful graphic | 2011 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | Image and original data provided by ART on FILE; artonfile.com

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo | Social Housing; central walkway leads past three story building with colorful graphic | 2011 | Buenos Aires, Argentina | Image and original data provided by ART on FILE; artonfile.com

Artstor Digital Library has collaborated with ART on FILE to share approximately 1,500 digital photographs of architecture, built environment projects, and landscape architecture in Buenos Aires.

In their most recent Artstor-sponsored campaign, photographers Colleen Chartier and Rob Wilkinson focused on the contemporary and historic buildings and landscape architecture of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Two areas of focus will be the Puerto Madero Waterfront district located along the Rio de la Plata and the Buenos Aires Ecological Reserve, a former resort area that is now home to hundreds of species of birds and other wildlife. In addition to historic buildings, Puerto Madero features Santiago Calatrava’s Puente de la Mujer, Philippe Starck’s Faena Hotel + Universe, Rafael Viñoly’s Fortabat Art Collection, and Cesar Pelli’s Repsol-YPF corporate tower. ART on FILE will also document the Recoleta Cemetery, University of Buenos Aires Law School, and Galerías Pacífico, as well as the city’s architecturally rich neighborhoods of San Telmo, La Boca, Palermo, Retiro, and Belgrano.

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Built by Julius Frontinus, Proconsul of Asia | Domitian Gate / Frontinus Gate / The Roman Gate | Built 82-83 AD | Pamukkale (Hierapolis), Turkey | Image and original data provided by Shmuel Magal, Sites and Photos; sites-and-photos.com

Built by Julius Frontinus, Proconsul of Asia | Domitian Gate / Frontinus Gate / The Roman Gate | Built 82-83 AD | Pamukkale (Hierapolis), Turkey | Image and original data provided by Shmuel Magal, Sites and Photos; sites-and-photos.com

Sites and Photos has contributed nearly 28,000 additional photos of ancient through medieval archaeological and architectural sites from countries including Spain, United Kingdom, France, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Turkey to the Artstor Digital Library. The images provide broad and in-depth documentation of the ancient world, including Classical, Megalithic, Islamic, Crusader, and Gothic archaeology and architecture, as well as Greek and Roman painting, sculpture, mosaics, and decorative arts.

Based in Israel, Sites and Photos specializes in the digital documentation of ancient archaeology, architecture, and art. Samuel Magal, Owner and Chief Photographer, is a trained archaeologist specializing in Classical and Marine archaeology. Since 1999, he has photographed hundreds of sites and museums throughout the Mediterranean. (more…)

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Kaufmann House by architect Richard Neutra Palm Springs, CA, 1947. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Used with permission. Julius Shulman Photography Archive, Research Library at the Getty Research Institute (2004.R.10)

Kaufmann House by architect Richard Neutra Palm Springs, CA, 1947. © J. Paul Getty Trust. Used with permission. Julius Shulman Photography Archive, Research Library at the Getty Research Institute (2004.R.10)

by Laura Schroffel, Library Assistant in Special Collections Cataloging at the Getty Research Institute

Co-published with The Iris, the online magazine of the Getty.

The Getty Research Institute recently collaborated with the Artstor Digital Library to digitize and share approximately 6,500 images from the Julius Shulman photography archive, series II and III. The work of American architectural photographer Julius Shulman (1910– 2009) comprises the most comprehensive visual chronology of modern architecture in the Americas, with a detailed focus on the development of the Los Angeles region. Spanning 70 years, it is a critical visual record of the metropolis’s evolution. The images are available now both on the Artstor Digital Library and in the Getty Research Institute’s digital collections.

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artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and Columbia University are collaborating to release 5,000 images and 850 QTVR panoramic views of Byzantine and Ottoman monuments in Istanbul and Edirne, Mesopotamian sites in Northern Iraq, and early Christian and Classical sites in Rome.

The agreement includes two Artstor-sponsored campaigns: 2,000 photographs and approximately 250 panoramic views of Byzantine and Ottoman monuments in Istanbul and Edirne; and 1,000 photographs  and 100 panoramic views from Northern Iraq, focusing on Mesopotamian sites, but including a broad survey of the built environment from the 8th century BCE to the 19th century. The agreement also includes 2,000 photographs and approximately 500 panoramic views from a previous Columbia University campaign documenting early Christian and Classical sites in Rome. These releases will join the 6,000 images and QTVRs already available in the Artstor Digital Library.

To learn more about Artstor’s collaborations with Columbia University, visit Columbia University: Architecture and QTVR Panoramas of World Architecture in Artstor.

Related collections:

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Sedefkâr Mehmed Ağa | Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque);  facade detail | 1609 to 1616 | Istanbul, Turkey | Image and original data provided by ART on FILE; artonfile.com

Sedefkâr Mehmed Ağa | Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Blue Mosque); facade detail | 1609 to 1616 | Istanbul, Turkey | Image and original data provided by ART on FILE; artonfile.com

ARTstor Digital Library and ART on FILE have collaborated to release more than 1,500 new direct capture photographs of buildings, built-environment projects, and landscape architecture in Istanbul.

In their most recent ARTstor-sponsored campaign, photographers Colleen Chartier and Rob Wilkinson focused on architectural highlights in Istanbul. In particular, the campaign concentrated on contemporary developments in architecture and recent works by prize-winning Turkish architects. Historic projects were also documented to capture Turkey’s position between ancient and contemporary, east and west.  Some of the notable buildings and sites featured in this release include Istanbul’s ancient city walls; Santralistanbul Contemporary Art Museum, located in the restored and converted Silahtarağa Power Plant, the Ottoman Empire’s first urban power plant, originally constructed in 1911; the Şakirin Mosque of 2009 by Hüsrev Tayla and Zeynep Fadillioğlu, which serves as an entrance to the 700 year-old Karacaahmet Cemetery; and the Istanbul Museum and Social History Center, designed by Mehmet Konuralp, situated in the former Imperial Mint, among many other structures, parks, and notable sites.

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Wurts Bros | New York Worlds Fair, Continental Baking Co.;  1939 | Museum of the City of New York

Wurts Bros | New York Worlds Fair, Continental Baking Co.; 1939 | Museum of the City of New York

The ARTstor Digital Library and the Museum of the City of New York have collaborated to release more than 14,000 additional photos from the Wurts Brothers Company.

The commercial studio of Nathaniel and Lionel Wurts focused on architectural photography, producing more than 13,000 negatives now housed in the museum.  The Wurts Brothers Company (1894-1979) was commissioned by architects, developers, contractors, and manufacturers to photograph a wide range of buildings, both commercial and residential, such as apartment houses, townhouses, brownstones, skyscrapers, factories, churches, hotels, banks, theaters, libraries, restaurants, bridges, parks, etc.

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Lippo di Andrea | Scenes from the Life of Saint Cecilia; detail of Death of the Saint | Santa Maria del Carmine (Florence, Italy) | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; scalarchives.com; artres.com

Lippo di Andrea | Scenes from the Life of Saint Cecilia; detail of Death of the Saint | Santa Maria del Carmine (Florence, Italy) | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; scalarchives.com; artres.com

Anne C. Leader, Professor, SCAD-Atlanta

While the primary motivation for patrons of religious architecture and decoration was to gain or retain God’s grace, Florentine tomb monuments manifest a conflicting mix of piety and social calculation, reflecting tension between Christian humility and social recognition. Though some city churches still house many tombs, most of the thousands of original monuments have been moved, reused, or survive only in fragments. From the mid-thirteenth-century onward, Florence’s churches, both inside and out, were carpeted with floor slabs, coated with wall monuments, banners, and markers, and filled with stone caskets. Benefactors hoped to secure perpetual intercession for their souls, while preserving and promoting their family’s honor, with families typically installing tombs in multiple locations around the city. My research reconstructs the rich mosaic of tomb markers that once covered the floors, walls, and yards of the Florentine cityscape to bring us closer to how Florentines experienced the deaths and memories of their kin, friends, and competitors in the early modern city.

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Luke C. Dilton | Colored Women's League of Washington, D.C.; ca. 1894 | Eyes of the Nation: A Visual History of the United States (Library of Congress)

Luke C. Dilton | Colored Women’s League of Washington, D.C.; ca. 1894 | Eyes of the Nation: A Visual History of the United States (Library of Congress)

Amber N. Wiley, Ph.D. , Visiting Assistant Professor of Architecture, Tulane University

Historian Constance Green characterized Washington, D.C. in the early 1900s as the “undisputed center of American Negro civilization” in her 1969 book Secret City: History of Race Relations in the Nation’s Capital. This was America before the Harlem Renaissance, in which the average percentile of the capital’s black population ranged from 25-33% throughout the nineteenth century. This population peaked between 1960 and 1990. This black Washington spans from the antebellum period through abolitionism, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, Civil Rights, Black Power, Parliament’s “Chocolate City,” and the so-called “post-racial” Obama era.

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Placido Costanzi |Alexander the Great Founding Alexandria; 1736-1737 | The Walters Art Museum

Placido Costanzi |Alexander the Great Founding Alexandria; 1736-1737 | The Walters Art Museum

Marlene Nakagawa, Undergraduate student at the University of Oregon

During his ongoing series of campaigns, Alexander the Great founded or renamed nearly twenty cities after himself. From Pakistan to Turkey, these cities stood as a representation (as if one was necessary) of his omnipresence in the ancient world. Over the centuries, most of the Alexandrian cities have been destroyed, renamed, or absorbed into other territories. However, west of the Nile Delta stands Alexander’s lasting triumph: Alexandria, Egypt’s largest seaport and a dynamic force in the country’s ancient and modern economy.

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