Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Behind the scenes’ Category

2014 marks the 10th anniversary of Artstor as a live service. Every month this year, we will introduce you to the people behind our organization and the roles they play in supporting Artstor’s mission to use digital technology to enhance scholarship, teaching, and learning.

The core responsibilities of Artstor’s Metadata Department are to analyze, edit, enhance, and map the data we receive from our collection contributors, with the goal of aiding image discovery in the Digital Library. Working with the Collections, Legal, Production, and Technology teams, we strive to find efficient and innovative ways of adding new content to Artstor.

Metadata6

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Sassetta |Madonna of the Snow Altarpiece | 1430-1432 | Galleria degli Uffizi | Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y. RIGHT: Foto Reali Archive (National Gallery of Art, Department of Image Collections)

Sassetta | Madonna of the Snow Altarpiece | 1430-1432 | Galleria degli Uffizi | Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y. RIGHT: Foto Reali Archive (National Gallery of Art, Department of Image Collections)

Long-time users of Artstor may have noticed that the Digital Library holds a number of redundant images. Some come directly from the source collections or are the result of different collections that document the same works of art, while others are details. We often cluster these images, which can be revealed by clicking on the clustered images icon (i-cluster) below the thumbnails. Why not simply delete them? We’re glad you asked.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Production1rev_blog

2014 marks the 10th anniversary of Artstor as a live service. Every month this year, we will introduce you to the people behind our organization and the roles they play in supporting Artstor’s mission to use digital technology to enhance scholarship, teaching, and learning.

The Production Department is responsible for handling and processing the images that make up the Artstor Digital Library. We collaborate with contributors and other Artstor teams to bring together collections from all over the world and provide the best possible images to our users. Our role can be roughly divided into three parts:

(more…)

Read Full Post »

USteam2

2014 marks the 10th anniversary of Artstor as a live service. Every month this year, we will introduce you to the people behind our organization and the roles they play in supporting Artstor’s mission to use digital technology to enhance scholarship, teaching, and learning.

You know us as the friendly voice on the phone when you were uncertain if you could project images as a backdrop for a play. Perhaps you know us through quick email exchanges to help you learn how to update your software. Or maybe we met at an educational conference where we shared ideas on how to use Digital Library content in your classroom or research.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

D. James Dee and his archive

Photographer D. James Dee and his archive

In early June, the New York Times published an article about a massive (and massively intriguing) photography archive. D. James Dee, aka the SoHo Photographer, spent almost 40 years documenting contemporary art in New York City and, upon retiring, was searching for a home for his archive. Dee worked for many galleries such as Ronald Feldman Fine Arts Inc., Paula Cooper Gallery, Holly Solomon Gallery, OK Harris, and artists such as George Segal, Jeff Koons, and many others, in particular during SoHo’s art boom in the 1980s. The archive comprises slides, transparencies, negatives, and digital photographs of approximately 250,000 works of art.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

John Marin | Hurricane | 1944 | Image © Indianapolis Museum of Art; imamuseum.org | © 2008 Estate of John Marin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

John Marin | Hurricane | 1944 | Image © Indianapolis Museum of Art; imamuseum.org | © 2008 Estate of John Marin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

How the ARTstor Digital Library Weathered the Storm
By Mary Finer, Project Coordinator

ARTstor is in the goal-setting time of the year, and expanding our disaster recovery efforts is high on the Technology department’s list—especially after last year. We’re in pretty good shape though. While sites such as Buzzfeed and The Huffington Post were down during “Superstorm” Sandy, the ARTstor Digital Library remained accessible.

ARTstor has servers in Manhattan and Denver, and each location has backups of each other in case disaster strikes. In New York our servers are at 60 Hudson Street, a.k.a. “the Hub,” a 1.8 million square foot facility where the Internet’s transatlantic cable lands. It used to be the center of Western Union’s telegraph network when it was built in the late 1920s, and is now the Grand Central Station of the Internet.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Lily Galib, Production Associate, Image Quality Control, has written a three-part post on the ins-and-outs of light value adjustments. Part 1 covered histograms, part 2 working with Photoshop’s Levels Adjustment Tool and the Curves Adjustment Tool, and part 3 concludes with color.

Color:

Levels and Curves adjustment layers showing the color channel selector. This is where you can select individual color channels to work with if you’re making color adjustments, or RGB if you’re adjusting light values.

When making color adjustments with the Levels Adjustment Tool and the Curves Adjustment Tool, the basic functions are the same (3 set adjustment points for Levels; anchor points for Curves) but you break the histogram down into the individual color channels. There are a few different color working spaces, but the ones you will most commonly encounter are RGB and CMYK. Generally speaking, RGB is used for images that will be viewed on a screen and CMYK is used for print. Digital cameras capture images in RGB, which stands for red, green, and blue. CMYK stands for cyan, magenta, yellow, and black, which are the ink colors used in printing. I’m only going to deal with RGB here since it is the color space you’re most likely to use. At ARTstor we always work in RGB. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Lily Galib, Production Associate, Image Quality Control, has written a three-part post on the ins-and-outs of light value adjustments. Part 1 covered histograms, part 2 covers working with Photoshop’s Levels Adjustment Tool and the Curves Adjustment Tool, and part 3 concludes with color.

Adjusting with the Levels Adjustment Tool:

Levels adjustment layer, showing the histogram with the three adjustment points

Levels is a fairly basic tool for making light value adjustments. When adjusting with Levels, you have three set adjustment points laid out on top of a histogram: black, white, and a midpoint adjuster. You make changes to the histogram by sliding these three adjusters along a horizontal line at the bottom of the histogram. Moving the black and white adjusters sets the black and white points and moving the midpoint adjuster redefines the midpoint. Sliding the midpoint adjuster to the left stretches the values between the midpoint and the black point (0) and compresses the values between the midpoint and the white point (255). This lightens the midtones and increases the contrast in the darker half of the histogram, while decreasing it in the lighter half. As a result you will see more detail in the darker midtones and less in the lighter midtones. Sliding the midpoint adjuster to the right does the opposite.  Once you set these points, Photoshop will interpolate the light values accordingly and even out the histogram. The black and white points that you set become the ends with the midpoint once again centered between the two. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Every month the ARTstor Blog announces new available collections from an international community of museums, artists, artists’ estates, photographers, scholars, special collections, and photo archives. Many teams in ARTstor work behind the scenes to make this possible: User Services, Library Relations, Production, Communications, Metadata & Cataloging, Collection Development, Finance, Human Resources/Administration, Legal, Software Development, Database Administration/Systems, User Experience, Quality Assurance, and Implementation. This month we begin a new series in which staff members explain the many steps required to share these images with you.

Lily Galib, Production Associate, Image Quality Control, has written a three-part post on the ins-and-outs of light value and color adjustments. Read part 2 and part 3.

The Production Department’s Imaging team (L to R): Lee Caron, Senior Production Associate; Lily Galib, Production Associate; Todd Forde, Production Associate; Quaid Kocur, Imaging Production Supervisor.

At ARTstor, we have a philosophy of maintaining the integrity of the original artworks we feature in the Digital Library and representing them as accurately as possible. Consequently, our focus in the Production department is on image correction rather than image manipulation. This means that preserving detail is a priority when making light value and color corrections, and we never do retouching on top of artwork.  For example, if a slide of a painting has been stored in poor conditions and is dirty and color shifted, we will correct for the color shift in order to match the actual painting as closely as possible, but we won’t push our adjustments into the realm where Photoshop is creating false color or detail. We won’t remove dirt from the top of a painting because that would alter the artwork and create an inaccurate representation.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 254 other followers