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Archive for the ‘Humanities & Social Sciences’ Category

Paul-Émile Bécat, André  Gide,  1919, La Bibliothèque de l'INHA-collections Jacques Doucet. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Paul-Émile Bécat, André Gide, 1919, La Bibliothèque de l’INHA-collections Jacques Doucet. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

This year’s Nobel Prize winners in literature are set to be announced next week. Despite there being no public information about the candidates–the list is kept secret for fifty years after each award–U.K. bookmaker Ladbrokes has been busy taking bets.

While we’re as much in the dark as to who will win as anyone else, we can offer a list of all the previous winners, along with links to dozens of their portraits (or, in the case of Thomas Mann, to a photo of his hands) in the Artstor Digital Library.

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Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates, 1787, The Metropolitan Museum of Art . Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates, 1787, The Metropolitan Museum of Art . Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Introduction to Philosophy
Carl Hammer, Lecturer, Communication Studies, University of MN, Twin Cities

This curriculum guide introduces the student to the basic problems, methods and theories of western philosophy.  It looks at issues in the theory of reality, knowledge and ethics. This includes some of the main problems in the philosophy of mind, religion, and action. It begins with a look at some of the tools and methods of philosophy, such as deduction, induction, and definition. Images allow students to envision real and imaginary examples of the problems and theories in philosophy, as well as provide an engaging visual “anchor” to aid in their retention. 

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Alexandria, Map, 1619 | Image and original data provided by Bryn Mawr College

Alexandria, Map, 1619 | Image and original data provided by Bryn Mawr College

Navigating the tremendous number of images in the Artstor Digital Library can be daunting, particularly to those in fields outside of art history. Where to start looking for images for, say, an Introduction to Philosophy class? To address that hurdle, we are introducing curriculum guides – collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses.

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Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.;www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; http://www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

“Was this the face that launched a thousand ships?”

So asks the title character in Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus upon seeing the radiant ghost of Helen of Troy. Marlowe was not the only artist to be captivated by Helen and her fabled beauty. Indeed, for millennia, painters, sculptors, poets and playwrights have been inspired by her story.

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saca-logoArtstor Digital Library and San Anto Cultural Arts have made available more than 60 images of murals created as part of the organization’s Community Mural/Public Art Program.

San Anto Cultural Arts (SACA) is a nonprofit learning space that promotes and encourages organic and cultural self-expression in San Antonio, Texas. A small group of community residents established the organization in 1993 in the heart of the city’s Westside community, near the Alazan-Apache Housing Projects.

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artstor_logo_rgbArtstor is collaborating with Barbara Anello to share approximately 190 images of graffiti in New York City and 130 of the architecture, arts, and culture of Ladakh, India in the Digital Library.

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On July 14, we celebrated the storming of the Bastille, the momentous day in 1789 that marked the beginning of the French Revolution, and the beginning of the end of the monarchy.

While it is a day revered by the citoyens of France, it has come to symbolize the declining fortunes of the king and his once celebrated and later reviled wife, Marie Antoinette.

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine | Photographer: Gérard Blot. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y. artres.com

History has revised the narrative of the Queen whose apocryphal utterance “let them eat cake” allegedly flaunted her disregard for her starving subjects.

Beginning with the nineteenth-century biography by the Goncourt brothers, and the insightful study of Zweig (1932), and culminating in recent portrayals, notably Coppola’s film of 2006, and Thomas’ chronicle of Marie Antoinette’s final days, Farewell, My Queen (published in 2003 and released as a film in 2012), characterizations of the monarch have softened and become more nuanced.

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