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Archive for the ‘K-12’ Category

EventARTstor’s Selected Monuments project is a new teaching resource in support of the newly-required 250 key works of art and architecture in the Advanced Placement® Art History curriculum. Join Dana Howard, experienced AP® Art History teacher, on a free webinar to learn how the project and the Digital Library’s 1.6 million images enhance classroom teaching and assist students in preparation for the AP® exam.


Advanced Placement® and AP® are trademarks registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this website.

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Jacques-Louis David | The Oath of the Horatii | 1784 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Jacques-Louis David | The Oath of the Horatii | 1784 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Artstor’s Selected Monuments project is a new teaching resource in support of the revised Curriculum Framework for the Advanced Placement® Art History course. The image groups and accompanying essays will eventually cover all 250 key works of art and architecture required for AP® Art History courses. Along with the Digital Library’s 1.6 million images, the project enhances classroom teaching in preparation for the AP® exam and provides support for anyone teaching these works of art.

Senior K-12 Relationship Manager Dana Howard, an experienced Art History teacher, has been leading the team creating the project.

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Wine Making (Vine Shoots, Putti Gathering Grapes and Male Bust; Grape-gathering Cupids); detail | c. 350 CE | Chiesa di S. Costanza (Rome, Italy) | Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. ; artres.com ; scalarchives.com | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Wine Making (Vine Shoots, Putti Gathering Grapes and Male Bust; Grape-gathering Cupids); detail | c. 350 CE | Chiesa di S. Costanza (Rome, Italy) | Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y. ; artres.com ; scalarchives.com | (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Gregory K. Martin, Ph.D.
Upper School Director, La Jolla Country Day School

In a compelling study of Western United States history, Patricia Nelson Limerick quotes Nannie Alderson, a former Virginian who moved to Montana in 1883. Alderson, looking back on a unique feature of her experience, recollected that there was on the frontier an abundance of cans: “Everyone in the country lived out of cans [...] and you would see a great heap of them outside every little shack” (“Closing the Frontier and Opening Western History”).

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Jacob A. Riis | East Side Public Schools 1; ca. 1890 | Museum of the City of New York

Jacob A. Riis | East Side Public Schools 1; ca. 1890 | Museum of the City of New York

When I first joined ARTstor, it was from the perspective of an art history and humanities teacher. In my own little niche, the ARTstor Digital Library was what one friend called “the candy store for art historians.” As I familiarized myself with the wide array of candy available, I was also building my understanding of the way the Common Core State Curriculum Standards include visual resources in research, analytical, and presentation skills across the K-12 curriculum. It was then that I began to see the Digital Library as the candy store for all of us, including K-12.

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Foundations in Art: Theory and Education (FATE)
April 4 – April 6, 2013
Hyatt Regency Savannah, Savannah, GA

Dana Howard, Senior K-12 Relationship Manager, will be presenting at the FATE 2013 Conference in Savannah as part of a panel discussion called “Building Bridges: AP Art History and the Studio Art Student.”

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Pantheon; Interior view #1 | 118-126 CE | QTVR Panoramas of World Architecture (Columbia University) | Visual Media Center; learn.columbia.edu

Pantheon; Interior view #1 | 118-126 CE | QTVR Panoramas of World Architecture (Columbia University) | Visual Media Center; learn.columbia.edu

By Dana Howard

True confession: I was a sporadic—and inattentive—user of the ARTstor Digital Library. My high school was a fairly early adopter of ARTstor. I used it a lot on those early years, but as I had more and more of my slides “in the can,” I stopped paying attention to the changes taking place in the Digital Library.

I would periodically run to ARTstor when I was asked to do presentations at the last minute, (I found the ability to do a quick download of Image Groups to PowerPoint very helpful), but for the most part I was too busy to explore new tools and new collections as they were announced. I think I was typical for a high school user; I was busy teaching and felt constantly bombarded with new resources elsewhere.

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Jacob Lawrence | The migration gained in momentum, 1940-41| Image and original data provided by The Museum of Modern Art | © 2008 Estate of Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Margaret Teillon
Volunteer educator
Wachovia Education Resource Center, Philadelphia Museum of Art

From a very early age children love to read, be read to, and look at pictures in books. Recognizing the joy children bring to picture books, I have developed teaching materials using selected children’s literature combined with ARTstor images. My goal is to enhance literacy instruction and provide an interdisciplinary method of teaching social studies, language arts, and art appreciation. For the youngest students, I have enhanced books such as Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown; and for elementary students have developed images for Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport. Included in each enhanced book is an OIV presentation and image palette with accompanying quotes from the text, and Web links to additional creative lessons. Teachers and home school educators have borrowed these materials for their own students.

For example, to provide a visual narrative of the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for young children, I used the picture book, Martin’s Big Words. Using images found in the ARTstor Digital Library, I chose age-appropriate art that would show the connection between the story and the 1960s Civil Rights movement. I included representative African American artists and works of art reflecting a variety of media: photography, collage, painting, fabric art, sculpture, and mural. Each slide within the OIV includes quotes from the text. The book begins with the words, “Everywhere in Martin’s home town, he saw the signs.” Photographs depicting the segregated South accompany those words. Horace Pippin’s Mr. Prejudice is juxtaposed with, “Sooner or later, all the people will have to discover a way to live together.” Henry Ossawa Tanner’s Banjo Lesson provides a gentle yet powerful visual reminder of the words, “Hate cannot drive out hate. Only love can do that.” To memorialize the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as presented in the text, the OIV concludes with Faith Ringgold’s Dream Two and Augusta Savage’s Lift Every Voice and Sing. After borrowing these materials, a second grade teacher reported, “Each student chose a quote from the book and made a collage to illustrate the words.” One student in her class (Shira) selected the quote “Love is the key to the problems of the world.” Shira said, “The quote is sticking off to the side. Now I’m going to make a heart and inside the heart put a key.”

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Even the youngest students can learn from this connection between ARTstor images and early literature. Alexis, a Kindergarten teacher, used my enhanced version of Goodnight Moon. She printed images from the OIV, and placed these images in a pile on the floor. As she read the book, students took turns selecting matching images from the pile – which were then placed in sequential order. This activity reinforced the concept of reading from left to right by allowing them to retell the story from their sequenced images. The combination of children’s literature with ARTstor images gives teachers the opportunity to form extensions to other topics, to engage students in conversation, to reinforce reading skills, and to forge creative thinking.

Read the other ARTstor Travel Awards 2012 winners here.

To view the complete image groups that accompany this and other Travel Awards-winning essays, visit the ARTstor Digital Library’s Featured Groups and click on Travel Awards.

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Jacquelyn DeLombard

Beginnings Pre-School owner/teacher, Philadelphia Museum of Art Teacher Resource Center volunteer

Several weeks ago, the pre-kindergarten and kindergarten children from Beginnings Learning Center were at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (PMA) for one of the five lessons they attend during the school year. For the program, “Museum Looks and Picture Books,” PMA had sent the book, A Chair for my Mother, to school for the children to read prior to their visit, and now the class was following the guide to the American Wing to look at and discuss chairs. All of a sudden a child yelled, “Look! There’s Chuck Close! I want to go look at the rectangles and squares!”

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Obviously the children not only knew their shapes, but also were very familiar with Chuck Close, who had previously been the artist of the month in their classroom, and thanks to ARTstor’s zoomable images were very aware of the shapes he used in his work.

Children are taught to recognize and classify objects around them according to the attributes of shape, size, and color. These are the basics for nearly all learning that follows: writing, reading, mathematics, and even common household tasks like matching their socks or putting away their toys. For years preschool teachers have collected picture files from magazines, calendars and discarded posters and artwork because, next to a concrete object, an image is the clearest way to teach a young child something new. With the images from ARTstor, the teacher is able to use works of art to teach very young children the simplest concepts of shape, size, and color, and continue to the more complex as children are ready for additional attributes or combinations thereof. At the same time, the children are almost incidentally learning the names of the works of art and their creators.

With the images projected in front of them, they can create their own shapes in a variety of media: paint, shaving cream, chocolate pudding, or catsup. They can compare what they see in the images to things found in their own classroom: rectangular windows, circular tables, and the rhythm band triangle. On the way home they will see traffic signs and understand what they mean by the shape long before they can read the words. (Of course everything in the preschool environment is labeled, giving them the opportunity to compare the word to the object.) So when the children recognized the Chuck Close painting AND the shapes in it at the museum, the teacher knew they really understood what they had been taught.

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ARTstor is pleased to announce a new initiative that is designed to help museum education departments work with K-12 teachers in their communities as a means of integrating the study of works of art into arts education, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and science curricula.

Museum education departments at participating museums will be able to create presentations using images of art works and other materials depicted in the ARTstor Library. The presentations can be stored on the OIV tool, an offline presentation tool created by ARTstor, and then given to K-12 teachers working with those museum education departments for use in the classroom.

Museum education departments and teachers accessing images of art works through OIV can zoom in on images, display images together to compare and contrast individual images, view the data associated with the images, and create classroom presentations with the images.

K-12 teachers using the OIV images do not have to be at institutions participating in ARTstor. Instead, teachers will be able to obtain OIV presentations from museum education departments. To obtain the OIV presentations, teachers will need to follow a few simple steps. More details about those steps can be found below.

We hope this initiative, which has been prompted by feedback from museum educators, will facilitate the work of museum education departments with teachers in their communities, and will help develop the visual thinking skills of K-12 students.

If you have any further questions about how you can get involved please contact our Director of Museum Relations, Nancy Allen.

How will this work?
Museum educators work closely with K-12 teachers to prepare students for class visits to the museum. They also seek ways of integrating study of works of art into arts education, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and science curricula. ARTstor, a resource currently available and increasingly utilized by both communities, has been working on a way to facilitate the exchange of such information between these communities.

Slide sets of museum objects have been the traditional currency of the museum educator and teacher collaboration, but teachers are increasingly asking for digital images and museum educators are ready to relinquish the burden of the labor-intensive effort of duplicating, labeling and distributing the slides.

Over the past two years ARTstor has talked with museum educators about the use of ARTstor to support their work. Many were excited at the prospect of having ready access to works from other collections to supplement objects from their own museum as they prepare teaching units using ARTstor’s OIV. The problem, however, is that museums work with many schools that are not currently ARTstor participants and our terms and conditions did not allow them to save OIV presentations and give them to teachers on offline media.

We are pleased to announce a solution to this challenge. ARTstor now has a museum education department license which will allow participating museums to distribute images on OIV to K-12 teachers, even if the teacher’s school is a not an ARTstor participant.

How will this work? A teacher will need to come to the museum education department and sign an agreement. We have tried to make the process as simple as possible; the agreement is one page with the ARTstor terms and conditions of use attached. One copy of the signed agreement will be given to the teacher and another copy will be kept on file by the museum. After registering the teacher, the museum educator can provide previously prepared OIV presentations to the teacher, work with the teacher to a create custom presentations, and/or offer the teacher the opportunity to craft and save his/her own OIV presentations. The presentation can be stored on the teacher’s laptop or on offline media such as a CD or DVD. Teachers thus registered will be authorized to use the OIV presentations in their classrooms for 120 days and to renew their authorization by checking in and validating their registration at the museum.

We hope this development, which has been prompted by feedback from museum educators, will facilitate their work with teachers and help develop the visual thinking skills of K-12 students.

You may download and review our License Agreement on the ARTstor website.

If you have any further questions about how you can get involved please contact our Director of Museum Relations, Nancy Allen

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ARTstor is pleased to announce a new initiative that is designed to help museum education departments work with K-12 teachers in their communities as a means of integrating the study of works of art into arts education, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and science curricula. Museum education departments at participating museums will be able to create presentations using images of art works and other materials depicted in the ARTstor Library. The presentations can be stored on the OIV tool, an offline presentation tool created by ARTstor, and then given to K-12 teachers working with those museum education departments for use in the classroom.

Museum education departments and teachers accessing images of art works through OIV can zoom in on images, display images together to compare and contrast individual images, view the data associated with the images, and create classroom presentations with the images. K-12 teachers using the OIV images do not have to be at institutions participating in ARTstor. Instead, teachers will be able to obtain OIV presentations from museum education departments. To obtain the OIV presentations, teachers will need to follow a few simple steps. We hope this initiative, which has been prompted by feedback from museum educators, will facilitate the work of museum education departments with teachers in their communities, and will help develop the visual thinking skills of K-12 students.

If you have any further questions about how you can get involved please contact our Director of Museum Relations, Nancy Allen, at na@artstor.org.

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