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Archive for the ‘Manuscripts & Manuscript Illuminations’ Category

Raphael | Saint George and the Dragon | c. 1504 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

Raphael | Saint George and the Dragon | c. 1504 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

Carlo Crivelli | Saint George | ca. 1472 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Carlo Crivelli | Saint George | ca. 1472 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Saint George’s Day is celebrated on April 23. I know this because as a child I was obsessed with the world of make-believe. While my sister was collecting books on the natural sciences, I had a whole shelf devoted to children’s versions of Greek mythology, fairy tales, and folklore. The stories I loved best involved magic and monsters. To this day my mother will buy me used books if they have a dragon on the cover. And this is where Saint George comes in.

In the 13th century, Jacobus de Voragine wrote in The Golden Legend that Saint George was a Christian knight who in his travels came across a city called Silene that was being plagued by a dragon that lived in its pond. Silene’s inhabitants were forced to appease the monster by sacrificing their children. The victims were selected through a lottery system, and one day it was the king’s own daughter who drew the last lot.
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Mochica | Vessel with sea lion and feline(?) |  A.D. 500-750 | Image © Princeton University Art Museum

Mochica | Vessel with sea lion and feline(?) | A.D. 500-750 | Image © Princeton University Art Museum

The Princeton University Art Museum and ARTstor are now sharing approximately 600 images from the museum’s encyclopedic collections in the Digital Library. This is the first release of an approximately 10,000 projected images.

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Jan Van Eyck | The Ghent Altarpiece; open | completed 1432 | Lukas - Art in Flanders

Jan Van Eyck | The Ghent Altarpiece; open | completed 1432 | Lukas – Art in Flanders

ARTstor has collaborated with Lukas – Art in Flanders to share 4,440 images of art from more than 30 important Flemish museums and cultural institutions, including: The Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp, Groeningemuseum, The Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent, Foundation Terninck Antwerp, the City Archive of Bruges, and the Bruges Public Library.

The Lukas collection in the Digital Library features works from a variety of periods ranging from the 8th century to the 20th century and media including paintings, sculptures, drawings, and illustrations. Major artists include Hans Memling, Jan Provoost, Hieronymus Bosch, Peter Paul Rubens, Frans Hals, and James Ensor. The collection also includes new photography of The Ghent Altarpiece of 1432 by Hubert and Jan van Eyck, painted for the St. Bavo Cathedral of Ghent. Additionally, all of the metadata records in the Digital Library will be made available in English, French, and Dutch. (more…)

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Papilionidae; swallowtail butterfly | Collected: 8/1975, Madagascar, Africa | Yale University: Peabody Museum of Natural History; peabody.yale.edu

Papilionidae; swallowtail butterfly | Collected: 8/1975, Madagascar, Africa | Yale University: Peabody Museum of Natural History; peabody.yale.edu

Spring time is here and butterflies are already making their annual appearance, according to butterfliesandmoths.org. To celebrate, we’ve compiled a slide show of selections from a wide variety of eras, regions, and fields of study, from science to art to costume design.

Search the ARTstor Digital Library for butterfl* to find more than 1,000 images with the keywords “butterfly” or “butterflies.”

Click on any image to view the slide show and to read the full captions.

Our slide show includes an image of a very serious-looking butterfly collector from George Eastman House; several examples from the nearly 70 specimens of butterflies in Yale University’s Peabody Museum of Natural History; an 18th-century painting of a mischievous cat chasing a butterfly from Réunion des Musées Nationaux; a 1910 lithograph of the Ty-Bell Sisters, Aerial Butterflies from The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Circus Collection; a colorful illumination from the Book of Hours of Queen Isabella I, ca. 1495-1500, from The Cleveland Museum of Art Collection; and an evening dress and a bonnet from more than two dozen butterfly-themed dresses and accessories in The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Brooklyn Museum Costumes.

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Author: Zayn al-Din Isma'il ibn Hasan al-Jurjani | Compendium of Medicine | 22 Rabi' II 889 AH/AD 1484 | The Walters Art Museum

Author: Zayn al-Din Isma’il ibn Hasan al-Jurjani | Compendium of Medicine | 22 Rabi’ II 889 AH/AD 1484 | The Walters Art Museum

The Walters Art Museum has made 1,576 of a projected 4,000 images of paintings, drawings, sculpture, and decorative arts available in the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program.

The IAP program is intended to offload the costs of museums delivering high-resolution image files to scholars for academic publications, and to foster scholarly publication in the history of art by providing these high-quality TIFF image files free-of-charge to both ARTstor subscribers and non-subscribers alike. (more…)

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English | Apocalypse; Folio #: fol. 021r | c. 1250-1260 | Image and original data provided by the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

Tradition holds that on Halloween the walls between the worlds of the living and the dead weaken and spirits walk the earth. More recently, the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer combined this concept with the medieval motif of the hellmouth. In the show, the hellmouth is a weak place between dimensions that attracts demons and other supernatural creatures. If it were ever to open it would signal the end of the world. Suitably inspired, we ventured to explore the theme in the ARTstor Digital Library. A simple keyword search for hellmouth led us to an array of spooky artworks dating from the 11th century to the 17th century. (more…)

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The Walters Art Museum is making its nearly 4,000 images of paintings, drawings, sculpture, and decorative arts available in the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program.

The IAP program is intended to offload the costs of museums delivering high-resolution image files to scholars for academic publications, and to foster scholarly publication in the history of art by providing these high-quality TIFF image files free-of-charge to both ARTstor subscribers and non-subscribers alike.

With this agreement, The Walters Art Museum joins ARTstor’s eight current IAP contributors: the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Getty Research Institute, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Yale University Art Gallery, Princeton University Art Museum, Northwestern University Library, and University of California, Irvine, and Bryn Mawr College.

For more information, visit artstor.org/iap.

For more detailed information about this collection, visit The Walters Art Museum collection page

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John Adams Whipple | The Moon, 1857 – 1860 | The Metropolitan Museum of Art | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The first manned mission to land on the Moon touched down on July 20, 1969. Upon arrival, Commander Neil A. Armstrong famously reported, “The Eagle has landed.” The next day he would be the first human to walk upon the Moon’s surface, the capstone of mankind’s fascination with the satellite.

Enjoy this slide show featuring an early photograph of the Moon, Caspar David Friedrich’s Romanticist landscape, a Nepalese mandala of Chandra, god of the Moon, all courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art; Yamamoto Baiitsu’s painting of the Moon and waves from the Philadelphia Museum of Art Collection; and an Iranian manuscript illumination featuring the angel Israfil holding the Moon from the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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Want to see more? Do an advanced search in the ARTstor Digital Library for Moon in the Title field to find more than 1,000 results in many media from ancient times to the present. Be sure not to miss Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s irreverent painting, too racy for the ARTstor Blog!

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Judy Chicago | The Dinner Party, 1974-1979 | © Judy Chicago Photo © Donald Woodman | © 2008 Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Katherine Murrell
Instructor of Art History
Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design

In my class on women artists from the medieval period onward, one of the first activities students were asked to do was to work in small groups and write a list of ten female painters or sculptors active before 1950, but without looking for information online. Many minutes elapsed, and the group with the longest list only had eight names. It was a sobering realization that despite the hundreds of female practitioners of art, relatively few are commonly known. This oversight is apparent on many websites hosting libraries of images, but ARTstor is a notable and praiseworthy exception.

The tools available on ARTstor make researching and organizing presentations a streamlined delight, but the breadth and depth of its visual resources make it an outstanding library. The nearly 400 images from artist Judy Chicago are an exceptional example of this. Chicago’s landmark work, The Dinner Party, is widely represented in art history survey textbooks, and was a touchstone for our class. The studio photographs and other documentary images associated with the piece, and detailed images of various place settings, help vividly illustrate the scope of this collaborative and historic work.

Context of a smaller, older work was explored through the 12th-century image of Hildegard von Bingen, experiencing a vision like a fiery flame. This is another picture often shown in survey textbooks, but the ARTstor collection includes the facsimile page from her Liber Scivias, showing the illustration as accompanying its text, in addition to many other richly illustrated folios.

Artists of significant accomplishment such as Sofonisba Anguissola, Lavinia Fontana, Artemisia Gentileschi, and many others, are represented with plentiful images. The extensive material offers valuable opportunities for examining recurring subjects of interest, such as the Jewish heroine Judith. Artists’ self-portraits are another significant  topic for discussion. Angelica Kauffman, a founding member of London’s Royal Academy of Art, created an eloquent self-portrait where she chooses between her loves of art and music, an image that still makes a powerful statement today about professional commitment.

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Resources concerning the life and career of Rosa Bonheur include numerous paintings, studies, sketches, and photographs. Of particular note in the ARTstor collection is a permit for which she regularly applied to French authorities to wear men’s clothing in public, in order to gain easier access to male-dominated settings not readily open to women.

The quantity of images for many artists is impressive, but also the details and installation views of works.  The story quilts of Faith Ringgold come alive with close-ups of image and text, and the monumental scale of Louise Bourgeois’ spiders are all the more impressive for the exhibition images.

While putting together my course, ARTstor has been an invaluable partner, providing numerous images and source documents, and helping my students gain an expansive sense of the contributions of women artists in the present and past centuries. The field of art history, and the experience in the classroom, is undeniable richer for this resource.

Read the other ARTstor Travel Awards 2012 winners here.

To view the complete image groups that accompany this and other Travel Awards-winning essays, visit the ARTstor Digital Library’s Featured Groups and click on Travel Awards.

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The Princeton University Art Museum is partnering with ARTstor to share images from its encyclopedic collections in the Digital Library. Included are several hundred selections from the Museum’s vast holdings, of which approximately 10,000 images eventually will be available through ARTstor. The Museum’s renowned collections of art of the ancient Americas and photography are well represented, as are ancient, Byzantine, and Islamic art. The art of Europe is documented with polychrome wooden sculptures from the Middle Ages, old master paintings by fifteenth-century Italian artists Fra Angelico and Guido da Siena, Enlightenment-era paintings by Jacques-Louis David and Angelica Kauffmann, and nineteenth-century works by Gustave Courbet and Édouard Manet. The arts and cultures of Africa, and Asia also form key parts of the collections. For the latter, images in the Digital Library will include Chinese and Japanese Neolithic pottery and jade, ancient ritual bronze vessels, ceramics, metalware, woodblock prints, painting, and calligraphy. The collections also include examples of international modern and contemporary art.

The Princeton University Art Museum is one of the nation’s leading art museums, with over 72,000 works of art in its collections. The Museum was founded in 1882 on the belief that the study of great original works of art was essential to higher education and the enlightenment of the general public. In addition to displaying its collections, the Museum hosts many special exhibitions each year, accompanied by lectures, artists’ talks, scholarly symposia, concerts, film screenings, and family programs. Along with the University’s Department of Art and Archaeology and the Marquand Library, the Museum forms a dynamic center for the study of the fine arts. A selection of rights-cleared images in this collection that fall in the public domain will be included in ARTstor’s Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program.

Related collections:

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