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Archive for the ‘Paintings’ Category

Oliverio Toscani, Double Portrait of Andy Warhol, 1974, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Photo © MFAH, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Oliverio Toscani, Double Portrait of Andy Warhol, 1974, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Photo © MFAH, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Artstor and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston have released more than 5,000 images from the permanent collection in the Digital Library.

The images in this release include works by artists such as Diane Arbus, Alexander Archipenko, Robert Arneson, Uta Barth, George Condo, Delacroix, Dan Graham, William Klein, Dorothea Lange, Annie Leibovitz, Roy Lichenstein, Brice Marden, Claes Oldenburg, José Clemente Orozco, Irving Penn, José Guadalupe Posada, Frederic Remington, Gerhard Richter, Diego Rivera, Milton Rogovin, Ed Ruscha, Andres Serrano, Jennifer Steinkamp, Rufino Tamayo, James Turrell, Peter Voulkos, Joel Peter Witkin, Minor White, Rachel Whiteread, Frank Lloyd Wright, and many more.

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Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah's Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah’s Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Artstor and the J. Paul Getty Museum have released more than 5,000 images from the museum’s Open Content Program in the Digital Library.

The Getty’s Open Content Program makes available digital images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the public domain. Among the images now available in the Digital Library are works from the Museum’s permanent collection by artists such as Albrecht Altdorfer, Bronzino, Dürer, Alfred Stieglitz, Andrea del Sarto, Mantegna, Anthony van Dyck, Rodin, Pissarro, Canaletto, Caspar David Friedrich, Monet, Walker Evans, Correggio, Van Gogh, Titian, Tina Modotti, Gainsborough, Thomas Eakins, Théodore Géricault, Rembrandt, Raphael, Pontormo, Pieter de Hooch, Rubens, Gauguin, Cézanne, Parmigianino, Veronese, Poussin, Nadar, Lucas Cranach, Da Vinci, Julia Margaret Cameron, Fragonard, Watteau, Jacques-Louis David, Courbet, Klimt, Tiepolo, Vasari, Seurat, Goya, Delacroix, El Greco, Degas, and many more.

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saca-logoArtstor Digital Library and San Anto Cultural Arts have made available more than 60 images of murals created as part of the organization’s Community Mural/Public Art Program.

San Anto Cultural Arts (SACA) is a nonprofit learning space that promotes and encourages organic and cultural self-expression in San Antonio, Texas. A small group of community residents established the organization in 1993 in the heart of the city’s Westside community, near the Alazan-Apache Housing Projects.

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logo-mauritshuisArtstor and Mauritshuis are collaborating to make available 1,200 images of works and their versos from the museum’s permanent collection.

The Mauritshuis is home to the very best of Dutch Golden Age painting. More than two hundred key works from Dutch and Flemish masters are on display in the intimate rooms of this seventeenth-century mansion in The Hague, ranging from such masterpieces as Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl EarringThe Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp by Rembrandt, and The Goldfinch by Carel Fabritius, to genre paintings by Jan Steen, landscapes by Jacob van Ruisdael, still lifes by Adriaen Coorte, and portraits by Rubens.

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On July 14, we celebrated the storming of the Bastille, the momentous day in 1789 that marked the beginning of the French Revolution, and the beginning of the end of the monarchy.

While it is a day revered by the citoyens of France, it has come to symbolize the declining fortunes of the king and his once celebrated and later reviled wife, Marie Antoinette.

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine | Photographer: Gérard Blot. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y. artres.com

History has revised the narrative of the Queen whose apocryphal utterance “let them eat cake” allegedly flaunted her disregard for her starving subjects.

Beginning with the nineteenth-century biography by the Goncourt brothers, and the insightful study of Zweig (1932), and culminating in recent portrayals, notably Coppola’s film of 2006, and Thomas’ chronicle of Marie Antoinette’s final days, Farewell, My Queen (published in 2003 and released as a film in 2012), characterizations of the monarch have softened and become more nuanced.

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Maurice Prendergast, Bastille Day; Le Quatorze Juillet, 1892. Image and data from The Cleveland Museum of Art

Maurice Prendergast, Bastille Day; Le Quatorze Juillet, 1892. Image and data from The Cleveland Museum of Art

No matter where you were in the U.S. this Fourth of July, you probably had the opportunity to enjoy the Independence Day fireworks. Next week will be the turn for our friends in France to enjoy their revolution celebration with fireworks. Bastille Day, or Le quatorze juillet, commemorates the storming of the Bastille prison in Paris on July 14, 1789. The capture of the prison marked the beginning of the French Revolution and the end of Louis XVI’s absolute monarchy. Three years later the First Republic was born.

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Reginald Marsh, Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island, 1930, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a division of Florida State University. © 2008 Estate of Reginald Marsh / Art Students League, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Reginald Marsh, Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island, 1930, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a division of Florida State University. © 2008 Estate of Reginald Marsh / Art Students League, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

When the weather starts getting unbearable New Yorkers—Artstor staff included—flock to the boardwalks of Brooklyn’s Coney Island or Rockaway Beach in Queens.

This ritual is nothing new and was, in fact, one of the pet subjects of Reginald Marsh (1898 –1954), an American artist famous for his paintings of New York City in the ’20s and ’30s. His city scenes are remarkable for their palpable sense of movement—bodies walk or loiter on street corners, crowds swell as New York’s lights pulsate and glow in the background.

That Marsh’s canvases seem to vibrate is due not only to his staccato brush strokes and bright, reflective colors, but also to his choice of subject matter. Rather than portray New York City’s elite, Marsh turned to everyday people and entertainments. Favorite subjects included burlesque and Vaudeville performers, pedestrians and, yes, public beaches. (more…)

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