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Archive for the ‘Prints’ Category

Charlotte Perriand, Travail Et Sport; Salle À Manger - Cuisine – Bar, 1929, New York School of Interior Design Library, library.nysid.edu. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Charlotte Perriand, Travail Et Sport; Salle À Manger – Cuisine – Bar, 1929, New York School of Interior Design Library, library.nysid.edu. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Artstor and the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID) are now sharing more than 450 images of pochoir prints and photographic depictions of interior retail architecture and design in Paris from 1928-1932.

The pochoir process, made by applying layers of paint guided by thin zinc or copper cut-out stencils, is characterized by its crisp edges and brilliant colors. Pochoir illustration was popular in 1920s Paris and was often featured in French fashion journals such as Le Jardin des Dames et des Modes and the Gazette du Bon Ton. Both the pochoir and photographic plates represent Art Deco design in the period following the International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts of 1925. (more…)

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Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D'Arthur; "La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard", 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D’Arthur; “La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard”, 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley was born on August 21, 1872. Despite dying of tuberculosis at the young age of twenty-five in 1898, the artist managed to have a brilliant career full of controversy and scandal. He shot to fame with his illustrations for Thomas Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur in 1893, and then became notorious for his illustrations for Oscar Wilde’s Salome (1894).

Recurring images throughout his career follow two seemingly incongruous paths. There is an emphasis on sly, clever wickedness; a youthful disregard for propriety; and an interest in the perverse and profane. Overlapping imagery of melancholia and death lead the second path. These two broad and inconsistent currents each render distinct images of the same artist who was drawn to scandal and associated himself with the 1890s Symbolist crowd often scorned by the arts elite and general public alike.

The images in this post come from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and George Eastman House collections in the Artstor Digital Library.

Elizabeth Darocha Berenz

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Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah's Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah’s Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Artstor and the J. Paul Getty Museum have released more than 5,000 images from the museum’s Open Content Program in the Digital Library.

The Getty’s Open Content Program makes available digital images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the public domain. Among the images now available in the Digital Library are works from the Museum’s permanent collection by artists such as Albrecht Altdorfer, Bronzino, Dürer, Alfred Stieglitz, Andrea del Sarto, Mantegna, Anthony van Dyck, Rodin, Pissarro, Canaletto, Caspar David Friedrich, Monet, Walker Evans, Correggio, Van Gogh, Titian, Tina Modotti, Gainsborough, Thomas Eakins, Théodore Géricault, Rembrandt, Raphael, Pontormo, Pieter de Hooch, Rubens, Gauguin, Cézanne, Parmigianino, Veronese, Poussin, Nadar, Lucas Cranach, Da Vinci, Julia Margaret Cameron, Fragonard, Watteau, Jacques-Louis David, Courbet, Klimt, Tiepolo, Vasari, Seurat, Goya, Delacroix, El Greco, Degas, and many more.

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Albert Winslow Barker, Girl with basket, 1910 or 1916. Bryn Mawr College: Albert Winslow Barker Collection

Albert Winslow Barker, Girl with basket, 1910 or 1916. Bryn Mawr College: Albert Winslow Barker Collection

Bryn Mawr College’s Albert Winslow Barker Collection in Shared Shelf Commons brings back to light the work of an unfairly neglected American lithographer of the 1930s and uncovers his little-known photographs. And there is much to admire.

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Carter Medicine Company | Carter's Little Nerve Pills | 19th century | Cornell: Oskar Diethelm Library for the History of Psychiatry

Carter Medicine Company | Carter’s Little Nerve Pills | 19th century | Cornell: Oskar Diethelm Library for the History of Psychiatry

At the beginning of the nineteenth century the prevailing medical belief that “the more dangerous the disease, the more painful the remedy” meant that bloodletting, purging, and blistering were often prescribed. Not surprisingly, this led to the development of a market in patent medicines promising painless cure-alls. Manufacturers used advertising cards to promote a world of pleasant medical fixes with friendly graphics and reassuring claims and testimonials. The ingredients in these patent medicines might have been as harmful as the illness, but they were more tempting than the agonizing solutions offered by doctors.

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Albrecht Dürer |"Das Rhinocerus" | 1515 | Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin; smb.museum

Albrecht Dürer |”Das Rhinocerus” | 1515 | Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin; smb.museum

Albrecht Dürer created his famous woodcut of a rhinoceros in 1515 based on a written description and an anonymous sketch of an Indian rhino that had arrived in Lisbon earlier that year. The animal was intended as a gift for Pope Leo X from the king of Portugal, but it never reached its destination, perishing in a shipwreck off the coast of Italy.

Dürer’s image is less than accurate, depicting an animal covered with an armor of hard plates, scales on its feet, and a small spiral horn on its back. This is not exactly surprising, considering the artist never saw the actual specimen. What is surprising is that his depiction served as a scientific reference for centuries, despite the existence of a similar but more accurate print by Hans Burgkmair, also from 1515. The similarities between the two images suggest that Burgkmair may have also based his woodcut on the same anonymous sketch.

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Top Right: Caspar David Friedrich | Lone Tree (Solitary Tree; Village Landscape with Morning Lighting) | 1822 | Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.  Left: Albrecht Dürer | 1526 | Gemäldegalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Bottom Right: Unbekannter Künstler, Maler | Abendmahl Christi, darunter die Gefangennahme | Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin | Images and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz; bpkgate.picturemaxx.com

Top Right: Caspar David Friedrich | Lone Tree (Solitary Tree; Village Landscape with Morning Lighting) | 1822 | Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Left: Albrecht Dürer | 1526 | Gemäldegalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Bottom Right: Unbekannter Künstler, Maler | Abendmahl Christi, darunter die Gefangennahme | Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin | Images and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz; bpkgate.picturemaxx.com

In collaboration with the Prussian Cultural Heritage Image Archive (Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz), Artstor now makes available more than 21,000 images of key works from the Berlin State Museums (Staatliche Museen zu Berlin) in the Digital Library. This collection includes vases and sculptures from the 6th to 4th century BC, Etruscan art, Byzantine art, the friezes and reconstruction of the west front of the Pergamon Altar, as well as masterpieces from such canonical artists as Albrecht Dürer, Caspar David Friedrich, Emil Nolde, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Hieronymus Bosch, Käthe Kollwitz, Lovis Corinth, Lucas Cranach the Elder, Matthias Grünewald, Max Ernst, Paul Klee, Peter Paul Rubens, and Rembrandt, among many others.

At the time of the agreement, Klaus-Dieter Lehmann, then President of the Prussian Cultural Properties Foundation, commented, “The Berlin State Museums have always been exceptionally significant places for scientific research and collection building. The modern possibilities of digital technology expand greatly on this potential and allow us not only to present these treasures, but also to link this effort with other important organizations, such as Artstor, to a degree previously unimaginable.” (more…)

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