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Archive for the ‘Renaissance, Baroque Art & Architecture in Europe’ Category

Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah's Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Jan Brueghel the Elder | The Entry of the Animals into Noah’s Ark; 1613 | The J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

Artstor and the J. Paul Getty Museum have released more than 5,000 images from the museum’s Open Content Program in the Digital Library.

The Getty’s Open Content Program makes available digital images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the public domain. Among the images now available in the Digital Library are works from the Museum’s permanent collection by artists such as Albrecht Altdorfer, Bronzino, Dürer, Alfred Stieglitz, Andrea del Sarto, Mantegna, Anthony van Dyck, Rodin, Pissarro, Canaletto, Caspar David Friedrich, Monet, Walker Evans, Correggio, Van Gogh, Titian, Tina Modotti, Gainsborough, Thomas Eakins, Théodore Géricault, Rembrandt, Raphael, Pontormo, Pieter de Hooch, Rubens, Gauguin, Cézanne, Parmigianino, Veronese, Poussin, Nadar, Lucas Cranach, Da Vinci, Julia Margaret Cameron, Fragonard, Watteau, Jacques-Louis David, Courbet, Klimt, Tiepolo, Vasari, Seurat, Goya, Delacroix, El Greco, Degas, and many more.

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Jacques-Louis David | The Oath of the Horatii | 1784 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Through a collaboration with the Réunion des Musées Nationaux (RMN) and Art Resource, Artstor will share nearly 7,000 additional images of works in the permanent collections of French national and regional museums in the Digital Library. This will bring the total of RMN images in the Digital Library to more than 14,000. The images will be selected from the archives of the Agence photographique de la RMN, which include the collections of 28 museums, including the Musée du Louvre, the Musée d’Orsay, and the Musée National d’Art Moderne – Centre Georges Pompidou.

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logo-mauritshuisArtstor and Mauritshuis are collaborating to make available 1,200 images of works and their versos from the museum’s permanent collection.

The Mauritshuis is home to the very best of Dutch Golden Age painting. More than two hundred key works from Dutch and Flemish masters are on display in the intimate rooms of this seventeenth-century mansion in The Hague, ranging from such masterpieces as Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl EarringThe Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp by Rembrandt, and The Goldfinch by Carel Fabritius, to genre paintings by Jan Steen, landscapes by Jacob van Ruisdael, still lifes by Adriaen Coorte, and portraits by Rubens.

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Katsushika Hokusai, Soccer, early 19th century, Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin State Museums. Image and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz bpkgate.picturemaxx.com

Katsushika Hokusai, Soccer, early 19th century, Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin State Museums. Image and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz
bpkgate.picturemaxx.com

By all accounts, Americans are becoming enthusiastic about soccer in unprecedented numbers. Rumor even has it that a handful of Artstor employees may have sneaked into a conference room yesterday to watch the US team confront Germany (though, when asked about the story, everyone seemed too busy with work to comment).

Of course, the game has long been popular around the world, as you can see from this slideshow of images ranging from the 17th to the 20th century, and from countries including Italy, France, Japan, Ghana, and yes, the United States.

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“It’s in the reach of my arms, / The span of my hips, / The stride of my step, / The curl of my lips. / I’m a woman/ Phenomenally. / Phenomenal woman, / That’s me.”

- Maya Angelou

Mickalene Thomas, Don't Forget About Me (Keri), 2009, exhibited at Lehmann Maupin, Spring 2009. Image and original data provided by Larry Qualls, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Mickalene Thomas, Don’t Forget About Me (Keri), 2009, exhibited at Lehmann Maupin, Spring 2009. Image and original data provided by Larry Qualls, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Women have long been used as inspiration for art. They have served as muses to both eastern and western culture, and our bodies have been used to represent the power and beauty of nature.

Yet the images of the female body that we see on a daily basis are often passive and hyper-sexualized. Women’s bodies are the go-to sales tactic in popular media and advertising. Yes, you might say, sex sells, but nothings sells as much as our sex sells. Women’s bodies sell beer, cars, perfume, burgers, chewing gum, and even animals rights (yes, you read that correctly – look up PETA’s campaigns) — and of course, the object that all of the women in these advertisements are ultimately selling is themselves.

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Raphael | Saint George and the Dragon | c. 1504 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

Raphael | Saint George and the Dragon | c. 1504 | Musée du Louvre | Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

Carlo Crivelli | Saint George | ca. 1472 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Carlo Crivelli | Saint George | ca. 1472 | Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Saint George’s Day is celebrated on April 23. I know this because as a child I was obsessed with the world of make-believe. While my sister was collecting books on the natural sciences, I had a whole shelf devoted to children’s versions of Greek mythology, fairy tales, and folklore. The stories I loved best involved magic and monsters. To this day my mother will buy me used books if they have a dragon on the cover. And this is where Saint George comes in.

In the 13th century, Jacobus de Voragine wrote in The Golden Legend that Saint George was a Christian knight who in his travels came across a city called Silene that was being plagued by a dragon that lived in its pond. Silene’s inhabitants were forced to appease the monster by sacrificing their children. The victims were selected through a lottery system, and one day it was the king’s own daughter who drew the last lot.
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Edward Penfield | The French Peasant and His Donkey & Rooster | Ackland Art Museum (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Edward Penfield | The French Peasant and His Donkey & Rooster | Ackland Art Museum (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Artstor and the Ackland Art Museum at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill have collaborated to share more than 1,600 images from the Museum’s permanent collection in the Digital Library

This release is composed of prints from the 15th century to the present day, and it brings the current number of images to 4,200 of a projected total of 16,000.

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