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Archive for the ‘Shared Shelf’ Category

Rob Stevenson | Snapping Turtle Upclose View of Face |2004 | UMASS Boston; Field Guide of Biodiversity Images |Photographic credit: Susan Speak

Rob Stevenson | Snapping Turtle Upclose View of Face |2004 | UMASS Boston; Field Guide of Biodiversity Images |Photographic credit: Susan Speak

The number of free images and video in Shared Shelf Commons, an open-access library of digital media, has now topped 100,000. The files come from institutions that subscribe to Shared Shelf, Artstor’s Web-based service for cataloging and managing digital collections.

We invite you to explore the entire resource at sscommons.org, or get started with some of the collections we have previously highlighted on this blog:

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Byron Company | Ships, Cunard Line, S.S. "Umbria", ca. 1897 | Museum of the City of New York

Byron Company | Ships, Cunard Line, S.S. “Umbria”, ca. 1897 | Museum of the City of New York

Artstor is pleased to announce the release of Shared Shelf 1.0. The most recent version of Artstor’s digital media management software includes three important new features: work record functionality, media batch-replace capability, and the addition of media URLs in Excel exports.

Shared Shelf is an enterprise-wide media management solution that enables institutions to catalog efficiently and consistently, make collections accessible to a targeted audience, and keep files safe. With Shared Shelf 1.0, users can now create work records and automatically copy all their data to multiple files in a manner compliant with VRA Core 4 metadata schema; replace media files in bulk without modifying data records; and generate a shareable URL linking to a media file within a Shared Shelf project by exporting selected data records to Excel.

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dpla_logo3Artstor has collaborated with six institutions to provide access to nearly 35,000 additional high-quality images in the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). The release is part of an ongoing initiative; last year, Artstor also provided access in DPLA to more than 23,000 high-quality images from major American museums and universities.

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Albert Winslow Barker, Girl with basket, 1910 or 1916. Bryn Mawr College: Albert Winslow Barker Collection

Albert Winslow Barker, Girl with basket, 1910 or 1916. Bryn Mawr College: Albert Winslow Barker Collection

Bryn Mawr College’s Albert Winslow Barker Collection in Shared Shelf Commons brings back to light the work of an unfairly neglected American lithographer of the 1930s and uncovers his little-known photographs. And there is much to admire.

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ShSh_logo2Artstor has released new tools for its Shared Shelf media management service that provide administrators with more control over their collection management. Shared Shelf enables institutions to upload, catalog, manage, preserve, and share digital media collections with targeted audiences; the new tools allow administrators to create new projects, allot different levels of access to catalogers, and direct content to publishing targets.

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We invited Lee T. Pearcy of Bryn Mawr College’s Department of Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, to discuss the Classicizing Philadelphia project.

classic-philadelphia

One way to think about America’s relationship with ancient Greece and Rome is to imagine a dialogue. Listen carefully as you wander around Philadelphia. You may be able to hear the conversation. Girard College emulates the Parthenon. The Art Museum, with its Corinthian porticoes and classical pediments, talks to Rome, and the Doric Waterworks below it talks to Greece. At the Arch Street Theater in 1858, Ernst Legouvé’s Medea talked to Euripides, and in the 2006 Mummers’ Parade, the Aqua String Band consulted Rome before it went “Roman Up Broad.” For three hundred years, Philadelphia has generated part of its own special look and feel, its culture, through a conversation with ancient Greece and Rome.

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Carter Medicine Company | Carter's Little Nerve Pills | 19th century | Cornell: Oskar Diethelm Library for the History of Psychiatry

Carter Medicine Company | Carter’s Little Nerve Pills | 19th century | Cornell: Oskar Diethelm Library for the History of Psychiatry

At the beginning of the nineteenth century the prevailing medical belief that “the more dangerous the disease, the more painful the remedy” meant that bloodletting, purging, and blistering were often prescribed. Not surprisingly, this led to the development of a market in patent medicines promising painless cure-alls. Manufacturers used advertising cards to promote a world of pleasant medical fixes with friendly graphics and reassuring claims and testimonials. The ingredients in these patent medicines might have been as harmful as the illness, but they were more tempting than the agonizing solutions offered by doctors.

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