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ShSh_logo2Artstor has released new tools for its Shared Shelf media management service that provide administrators with more control over their collection management. Shared Shelf enables institutions to upload, catalog, manage, preserve, and share digital media collections with targeted audiences; the new tools allow administrators to create new projects, allot different levels of access to catalogers, and direct content to publishing targets.

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Katsushika Hokusai, Soccer, early 19th century, Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin State Museums. Image and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz bpkgate.picturemaxx.com

Katsushika Hokusai, Soccer, early 19th century, Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin State Museums. Image and original data provided by Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz
bpkgate.picturemaxx.com

By all accounts, Americans are becoming enthusiastic about soccer in unprecedented numbers. Rumor even has it that a handful of Artstor employees may have sneaked into a conference room yesterday to watch the US team confront Germany (though, when asked about the story, everyone seemed too busy with work to comment).

Of course, the game has long been popular around the world, as you can see from this slideshow of images ranging from the 17th to the 20th century, and from countries including Italy, France, Japan, Ghana, and yes, the United States.

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Visitors viewing display cases and Bird Dome, Hall of the Birds of the World, 1927, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: H. S. Rice. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Visitors viewing display cases and Bird Dome, Hall of the Birds of the World, 1927, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: H. S. Rice. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Visiting the Museum of Natural History was high on my list of priorities on my first trip to New York City. This was in big part due to its mention in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye—even if, to be honest, I didn’t quite remember the role it played in the book.

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google-translateArtstor’s Technology team has embedded a Google translator button into the Digital Library, providing you with the ability to translate the site, collections, and metadata into the language of your choice.

Located at the top of the page to the right, the drop-down menu offers translation into 80 languages. We hope that this feature will ease your workflow and enable greater specificity in your research.

Buona ricerca!

Byron Company |  Sports- Bathing 1896 Far Rockaway Beach | Museum of the City of New York; mcny.org

Byron Company | Sports- Bathing 1896 Far Rockaway Beach | Museum of the City of New York; mcny.org

School is out for summer and everyone is headed home. Why not take the Digital Library with you? One of the many benefits of registering for an Artstor account is the ability to access the Digital Library away from campus.

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Reginald Marsh, Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island, 1930, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a division of Florida State University. © 2008 Estate of Reginald Marsh / Art Students League, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Reginald Marsh, Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island, 1930, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a division of Florida State University. © 2008 Estate of Reginald Marsh / Art Students League, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

When the weather starts getting unbearable New Yorkers—Artstor staff included—flock to the boardwalks of Brooklyn’s Coney Island or Rockaway Beach in Queens.

This ritual is nothing new and was, in fact, one of the pet subjects of Reginald Marsh (1898 –1954), an American artist famous for his paintings of New York City in the ’20s and ’30s. His city scenes are remarkable for their palpable sense of movement—bodies walk or loiter on street corners, crowds swell as New York’s lights pulsate and glow in the background.

That Marsh’s canvases seem to vibrate is due not only to his staccato brush strokes and bright, reflective colors, but also to his choice of subject matter. Rather than portray New York City’s elite, Marsh turned to everyday people and entertainments. Favorite subjects included burlesque and Vaudeville performers, pedestrians and, yes, public beaches. Continue Reading »

Ray De Lucia and Matt Kalmenoff working on Killer Whale Group, Hall of Ocean Life, 1967, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: Alex J. Rota. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Ray De Lucia and Matt Kalmenoff working on Killer Whale Group, Hall of Ocean Life, 1967, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: Alex J. Rota. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Artstor Digital Library and the American Museum of Natural History have released 1,700 images of objects from the Museum’s Division of Anthropology and historical photographs from the Research Library’s Photo Archive.

The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) is one of the world’s preeminent scientific and cultural institutions. Since its foundation in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret, and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world, and the universe through a wide-ranging program of scientific research, education, and exhibition. Continue Reading »

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