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google-translateArtstor’s Technology team has embedded a Google translator button into the Digital Library, providing you with the ability to translate the site, collections, and metadata into the language of your choice.

Located at the top of the page to the right, the drop-down menu offers translation into 80 languages. We hope that this feature will ease your workflow and enable greater specificity in your research.

Buona ricerca!

Byron Company |  Sports- Bathing 1896 Far Rockaway Beach | Museum of the City of New York; mcny.org

Byron Company | Sports- Bathing 1896 Far Rockaway Beach | Museum of the City of New York; mcny.org

School is out for summer and everyone is headed home. Why not take the Digital Library with you? One of the many benefits of registering for an Artstor account is the ability to access the Digital Library away from campus.

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Reginald Marsh, Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island, 1930, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a division of Florida State University. © 2008 Estate of Reginald Marsh / Art Students League, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Reginald Marsh, Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island, 1930, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, the State Art Museum of Florida, a division of Florida State University. © 2008 Estate of Reginald Marsh / Art Students League, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

When the weather starts getting unbearable New Yorkers—Artstor staff included—flock to the boardwalks of Brooklyn’s Coney Island or Rockaway Beach in Queens.

This ritual is nothing new and was, in fact, one of the pet subjects of Reginald Marsh (1898 –1954), an American artist famous for his paintings of New York City in the ’20s and ’30s. His city scenes are remarkable for their palpable sense of movement—bodies walk or loiter on street corners, crowds swell as New York’s lights pulsate and glow in the background.

That Marsh’s canvases seem to vibrate is due not only to his staccato brush strokes and bright, reflective colors, but also to his choice of subject matter. Rather than portray New York City’s elite, Marsh turned to everyday people and entertainments. Favorite subjects included burlesque and Vaudeville performers, pedestrians and, yes, public beaches. Continue Reading »

Ray De Lucia and Matt Kalmenoff working on Killer Whale Group, Hall of Ocean Life, 1967, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: Alex J. Rota. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Ray De Lucia and Matt Kalmenoff working on Killer Whale Group, Hall of Ocean Life, 1967, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: Alex J. Rota. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Artstor Digital Library and the American Museum of Natural History have released 1,700 images of objects from the Museum’s Division of Anthropology and historical photographs from the Research Library’s Photo Archive.

The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) is one of the world’s preeminent scientific and cultural institutions. Since its foundation in 1869, the Museum has advanced its global mission to discover, interpret, and disseminate information about human cultures, the natural world, and the universe through a wide-ranging program of scientific research, education, and exhibition. Continue Reading »

“It’s in the reach of my arms, / The span of my hips, / The stride of my step, / The curl of my lips. / I’m a woman/ Phenomenally. / Phenomenal woman, / That’s me.”

- Maya Angelou

Mickalene Thomas, Don't Forget About Me (Keri), 2009, exhibited at Lehmann Maupin, Spring 2009. Image and original data provided by Larry Qualls, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Mickalene Thomas, Don’t Forget About Me (Keri), 2009, exhibited at Lehmann Maupin, Spring 2009. Image and original data provided by Larry Qualls, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Women have long been used as inspiration for art. They have served as muses to both eastern and western culture, and our bodies have been used to represent the power and beauty of nature.

Yet the images of the female body that we see on a daily basis are often passive and hyper-sexualized. Women’s bodies are the go-to sales tactic in popular media and advertising. Yes, you might say, sex sells, but nothings sells as much as our sex sells. Women’s bodies sell beer, cars, perfume, burgers, chewing gum, and even animals rights (yes, you read that correctly – look up PETA’s campaigns) — and of course, the object that all of the women in these advertisements are ultimately selling is themselves.

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Boris Kustodiyev | Celebration on Uritsky Square in Honor of the Opening of the Second Congress of the Communist International, July 1920 (The Demonstration on Uritsky Square, Comintern); 1921. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com; scalarchives.com

Boris Kustodiyev | Celebration on Uritsky Square in Honor of the Opening of the Second Congress of the Communist International, July 1920 (The Demonstration on Uritsky Square, Comintern); 1921. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com; scalarchives.com

More than 1,500 images of art from Russian museums have been released in the Artstor Digital Library in collaboration with the Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives and Scala Archives.

Among the museums included in this release are the Hermitage, the Academy of Science, the Russian State Museum, the Russian National Library, the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, the Open Air Museum, and the Tretyakov Gallery. Continue Reading »

We invited Lee T. Pearcy of Bryn Mawr College’s Department of Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, to discuss the Classicizing Philadelphia project.

classic-philadelphia

One way to think about America’s relationship with ancient Greece and Rome is to imagine a dialogue. Listen carefully as you wander around Philadelphia. You may be able to hear the conversation. Girard College emulates the Parthenon. The Art Museum, with its Corinthian porticoes and classical pediments, talks to Rome, and the Doric Waterworks below it talks to Greece. At the Arch Street Theater in 1858, Ernst Legouvé’s Medea talked to Euripides, and in the 2006 Mummers’ Parade, the Aqua String Band consulted Rome before it went “Roman Up Broad.” For three hundred years, Philadelphia has generated part of its own special look and feel, its culture, through a conversation with ancient Greece and Rome.

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