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Théodore Géricault, Scene from the Race of the Barberi Horses. Image and original data provided by the Art Gallery of Ontario; ago.net. Image © Art Gallery of Ontario.

Théodore Géricault, Scene from the Race of the Barberi Horses. Image and original data provided by the Art Gallery of Ontario; ago.net. Image © Art Gallery of Ontario.

Artstor and the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) are now sharing more than 300 images from the Gallery’s permanent collection in the Digital Library. The AGO will eventually contribute selections from their Prints and Drawings collection, which covers the history of Western drawing and printmaking from 1400 to the present, as they undertake a major digitization project for this curatorial department.

Thanks to Artstor’s agreement with SODRAC, the principal society for reproduction rights in Canada representing major international and Canadian artists, works by contemporary artists in the AGO’s Collection in SODRAC’s repertoire will be available to the more than 1,500 institutions that subscribe to the Artstor Digital Library worldwide, including over 60 colleges, universities, museums, and schools in Canada. Continue Reading »

Louise Nevelson, Untitled [1], 1967, Amon Carter Museum of American Art. © 2012 Estate of Louise Nevelson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Louise Nevelson, Untitled [1], 1967, Amon Carter Museum of American Art. © 2012 Estate of Louise Nevelson / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Artstor and the Amon Carter Museum of American Art are now sharing nearly 3,000 images in the Digital Library.

The collection includes a substantial number of works from the museum’s Artists Archives, which consist of the archival collections of eight prominent American photographers of the twentieth century: Clara Sipprell (1885-1975), Erwin E. Smith (1886-1947), Karl Struss (1886-1981), Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), Nell Dorr (1893-1988), Eliot Porter (1901-1990), Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988), and Helen Post (1907-1979). These photographic collections are comprised of over 22,000 prints plus over 150,000 negatives. Other highlights to be released include Mexican War daguerreotypes and works by Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Curtis, Eadweard Muybridge, David Octavius Hill, and Southworth & Hawes. Continue Reading »

Charlotte Perriand, Travail Et Sport; Salle À Manger - Cuisine – Bar, 1929, New York School of Interior Design Library, library.nysid.edu. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Charlotte Perriand, Travail Et Sport; Salle À Manger – Cuisine – Bar, 1929, New York School of Interior Design Library, library.nysid.edu. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Artstor and the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID) are now sharing more than 450 images of pochoir prints and photographic depictions of interior retail architecture and design in Paris from 1928-1932.

The pochoir process, made by applying layers of paint guided by thin zinc or copper cut-out stencils, is characterized by its crisp edges and brilliant colors. Pochoir illustration was popular in 1920s Paris and was often featured in French fashion journals such as Le Jardin des Dames et des Modes and the Gazette du Bon Ton. Both the pochoir and photographic plates represent Art Deco design in the period following the International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts of 1925. Continue Reading »

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories from around the Web that we’ve been reading this week:

Unwitting models

The New Yorker spoke to two of the women in Garry Winogrand’s famous “World’s Fair, New York City” (1964) about what it was like to be in an iconic photograph. The Winogrand retrospective is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art until September 21, and you can find more than 100 of his photographs in the Artstor Digital Library.

Technology and the humanities

From James Shulman
President, Artstor

I’m writing to announce a call for collection-building proposals focused on at-risk archives of individual scholars. The Artstor Digital Library includes many image collections from individual scholars who have built important archives in support of their work.  Now, we are launching a project to preserve and increase the availability of these at-risk collections by inviting the Visual Resources community, which supports many such scholars, to identify and submit proposals for Artstor to provide some modest financial support to digitize and catalog some of these collections.  Artstor would then maintain the collections and make them available through the Artstor Digital Library as well as through open access initiatives (especially the Digital Public Library of America, with whom we have worked as a content hub since their April 2013 launch).

Continue Reading »

Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D'Arthur; "La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard", 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D’Arthur; “La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard”, 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley was born on August 21, 1872. Despite dying of tuberculosis at the young age of twenty-five in 1898, the artist managed to have a brilliant career full of controversy and scandal. He shot to fame with his illustrations for Thomas Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur in 1893, and then became notorious for his illustrations for Oscar Wilde’s Salome (1894).

Recurring images throughout his career follow two seemingly incongruous paths. There is an emphasis on sly, clever wickedness; a youthful disregard for propriety; and an interest in the perverse and profane. Overlapping imagery of melancholia and death lead the second path. These two broad and inconsistent currents each render distinct images of the same artist who was drawn to scandal and associated himself with the 1890s Symbolist crowd often scorned by the arts elite and general public alike.

The images in this post come from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and George Eastman House collections in the Artstor Digital Library.

Elizabeth Darocha Berenz

Often, it is the unconventional details that lend a building its sense of character. This is certainly true of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, a monument striking for its tilt of approximately 4 degrees.

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Bonanno Pisano, Campanile (Leaning Tower), exterior, 1174-1350, Pisa, Italy. (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com, scalarchives.com

The tilt was even more pronounced before modern efforts at stabilization began, and by some accounts has reached 8-10 degrees in past centuries. But while stabilizing the tower has been important to its physical preservation, it may have negatively affected the church’s historical legacy. Since the Leaning Tower of Pisa was straightened out, several other buildings–mainly in Germany and Switzerland–have been vying for the slanted spotlight, as was humorously reported by the New York Times in 2012.

However, no attempt at dethroning Pisa as home to the farthest leaning building has been as bold as that of Abu Dhabi, the capital city of the United Arab Emirates. Starting in 2007, the city began work on the Capital Gate, which rises at an 18-degree westward lean–more than four times that of the Leaning Tower of Pisa–along the city’s waterfront.

Continue Reading »

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