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Gustav Klimt, Burgtheater (Vienna, Austria); Death of Romeo and Juliet, 1884-1887. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com

Gustav Klimt, Burgtheater (Vienna, Austria); Death of Romeo and Juliet, 1884-1887. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y., artres.com

Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

Shakespeare: Text and Performance
Julia Reinhard Lupton, Professor, English, University of California, Irvine
This curriculum guide focuses on three plays: Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night, and Cymbeline. The reading list covers three genres (tragedy, comedy, romance) and leads from very familiar to less familiar works by Shakespeare. I use Artstor images to build out Shakespeare’s world and the worlds depicted in the plays; to explore themes from mythology and literature drawn on in these plays; to provide insight into subsequent stage history; and to inspire students’ own scenographic imaginations.

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Byron Company, New York Association for the Blind, Two Children at Table, 1933. Museum of the City of New York

When I was a child in the mere single digits, my family sat down to a Twilight Zone marathon. It was my first time watching the show, and I was introduced to aliens, pig people, post-apocalyptic towns, and, most frightening of all, dolls that came to life.

It was the ventriloquist dummy and the chatty doll that gave me nightmares. Just remembering the line “My name is Talky Tina and I don’t think I like you” still gives me shivers. There’s something about those inanimate objects with their stiff movements, glassy eyes, and blank faces that creeps me out.

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Mosaics, central courtyard: Ulysses and Sirens, House of Dionysos and Ulysses, Mid 3rdc, Dougga, Tunisia. Data and image from William L. MacDonald Collection, Princeton University

Mosaics, central courtyard: Ulysses and Sirens, House of Dionysos and Ulysses, Mid 3rdc, Dougga, Tunisia. Data and image from William L. MacDonald Collection, Princeton University

Artstor and Princeton University have collaborated to release approximately 4,500 images of architecture from the archives of William L. MacDonald in the Digital Library.

The collection in the Artstor Digital Library documents the city of Rome in great depth, as well as ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman architecture, Byzantine and Baroque architecture, and American architecture. The photographs were taken by MacDonald over a period of more than 40 years and include sites that now are largely inaccessible and monuments that have permanently changed.

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Luigi Garzi, Bellarmine Chapel, dome fresco, Rome, Italy. John Pinto Collection (Princeton University)

Luigi Garzi, Bellarmine Chapel, dome fresco, Rome, Italy. John Pinto Collection (Princeton University)

Artstor and Princeton architectural historian John Pinto have collaborated to share approximately 2,000 images of Italian architecture, landscape, and urbanism in the Digital Library.

Pinto’s photographs document Renaissance and Baroque architecture, landscape architecture, and monuments, including Hadrian’s Villa and Trevi Fountain. These images trace Rome’s history as a center of artistic production through the ages.

John Pinto is the Howard Crosby Butler Memorial Professor of the History of Architecture in the Princeton University Department of Art and Archaeology and is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Continue Reading »

Robert Howlett, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern, ca. 1857-1858. George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

The odd couple

A friendship as unexpected as the chance meeting on a dissecting table of a sewing machine and an umbrella: Salvador Dalí and Harpo Marx.

Moving vases

This is really fantastic: ancient Greek vases turned into animations.

Unusual supports

This artist uses coins as his canvas, which reminded us of “hobo nickels.”

And this artist uses Baltimore as his canvas as he draws with two wheels.

The perfect accessory 

New discoveries on a 500-year old Da Vinci painting: The Lady with an Ermine didn’t always include the ermine.

Dear diary

The secret diaries of American artists, not so secret anymore.

Russia before it turned red

Pre-revolutionary Russia, in color.

Paul-Émile Bécat, André  Gide,  1919, La Bibliothèque de l'INHA-collections Jacques Doucet. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Paul-Émile Bécat, André Gide, 1919, La Bibliothèque de l’INHA-collections Jacques Doucet. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

This year’s Nobel Prize winners in literature are set to be announced next week. Despite there being no public information about the candidates–the list is kept secret for fifty years after each award–U.K. bookmaker Ladbrokes has been busy taking bets.

While we’re as much in the dark as to who will win as anyone else, we can offer a list of all the previous winners, along with links to dozens of their portraits (or, in the case of Thomas Mann, to a photo of his hands) in the Artstor Digital Library.

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Byron Company, Sports, Field Sports, Manhattan Field, 1896. Museum of the City of New York.

Byron Company, Sports, Field Sports, Manhattan Field, 1896. Museum of the City of New York.

Reminder: The deadline for Artstor’s Digital Humanities Awards is October 15, 2014.

The award aims to facilitate the most innovative and intellectually stimulating projects in the field. Winners will receive five years’ free access to Shared Shelf, Artstor’s digital media management software, to upload, catalog, manage, store, and share their project.

To enter, simply describe your Digital Humanities project in 1,000 words or less.

Full rules and application instructions at artstor.org/dha.

Winners will be announced in early December.

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