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Colonial WilliamsburgArtstor and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation are collaborating to make available approximately 1,000 images of works from the Foundation’s collections in the Digital Library.

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation operates the world’s largest living history museum in Williamsburg, Virginia—the restored 18th-century capital of Britain’s largest, wealthiest, and most populous outpost of empire in the New World. Here it interprets the origins of the idea of America in the years before and during the American Revolution. The story of Colonial Williamsburg’s Revolutionary City tells how diverse peoples, having different and sometimes conflicting ambitions, evolved into a society that valued liberty and equality.

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Worcester Art MuseumArtstor and the Worcester Art Museum are collaborating to release more than 20,000 images of artworks from the Museum’s permanent collection in the Digital Library.

Founded in 1898, the Worcester Art Museum (WAM) is world-renowned for its 38,000-piece encyclopedic collection of paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, photography, prints, drawings, arms and armor, and new media. The works span over 5,000 years of art and culture. In addition to the Roman mosaic-laden Renaissance court and French chapter house, strengths of the permanent collection include collections of European and North American painting, prints, photographs, and drawings; Asian art; Greek and Roman sculpture and mosaics; and contemporary art. With its recent acquisition of the collection from the Higgins Armory Museum, WAM continues to diversify and expand its curatorial and programmatic offerings.

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PacitaArtstor and the Pacita Abad Art Estate are collaborating to make available 500 images of the artist’s works in the Digital Library.

The internationally renowned Philippine-American artist Pacita Abad (1946 – 2004) was born in Batanes, a small island in the South China Sea. Her 32-year painting career began when she had to leave the Philippines due to her student political activism against the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, and she traveled to the United States to study law. However, after a few years she switched careers to dedicate her life to art and studied painting at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C. and The Art Students League in New York City. Since that time Abad never stopped being a nomadic artist and painted the globe while working on six continents and traveling to over 50 countries. During her career she created over 4,500 artworks, and her paintings were exhibited in more than 200 museums and galleries around the world.

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Stanford White, Bronx Community College (formerly New York University), Gould Memorial Library; Interior view #1 of rotunda, 1896. Data from: The Trustees of Columbia University, Visual Media Center, Department of Art History and Archaeology, learn.columbia.edu

Stanford White, Bronx Community College (formerly New York University), Gould Memorial Library; Interior view #1 of rotunda, 1896. Data from: The Trustees of Columbia University, Visual Media Center, Department of Art History and Archaeology, learn.columbia.edu

In addition to still images, you can find videos, audio files, 3D images, and panorama (QTVR) files within the Artstor Workspace. You can search by media type using the file extensions as keywords:

  • Videos – search for mov. Clicking movieicon will open your default video player.
  • Audio – search for mp3. Clicking sound will open your default audio player.
  • Panoramas (QTVR) – search for qtvr. Clicking i-qtvr2 will open a QuickTime Player window where you can view the environment by panning 360°.
  • 3D images – search for 3D. Clicking i-3d will open the 3D image in rotation in the image viewer. To stop or restart the rotation, click the rotatation icon.
Louis Lafon, Railyard Scene, c. 1880. Image from The Trout Gallery, Dickinson College.

Louis Lafon, Railyard Scene, c. 1880. Image from The Trout Gallery, Dickinson College.

By James Shulman, Artstor President

When I was in Fort Worth for the ARLIS conference this spring, I learned a lot about the history of the cattle business in the post-Civil War period. The cities of the East and the West were hungry for Texas beef, but there was no practical way to get it to them. The age of the cowboy took place because a particular kind of soul was needed to lead the herds north from Fort Worth through exposed frontier to the train yards of Kansas City. But when the railroad reached Fort Worth (in 1886), everyone quickly adapted. The cattlemen soon realized that they could do more than load their cattle on trains at Fort Worth, and entrepreneurs raised capital from wealthy Boston investors to build “processing” plants at the Fort Worth rail yards. The moral of this story (and I’m sorry to have turned off the vegetarians in the reading audience) is simply that everyone involved in the process was more than happy to take advantage of infrastructure as it became available.

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colby collegeArtstor and the Colby College Museum are collaborating to make available approximately 1,000 additional images from the museum’s permanent collection in the Digital Library.

Founded in 1959, the Colby College Museum of Art has built a significant permanent collection of more than 6,000 works. The museum serves both as a teaching resource for Colby College and as an active cultural institution for the residents of Maine and visitors to the state.

For more detailed information about this collection, visit the Colby College Museum of Art page in Artstor

LINKMAN4Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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