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Takashima Kazuyuki; Detailed map of the developed port of Yokohama; 1859. Image and original data courtesy of University of British Columbia Library, Rare Books and Special Collections

Takashima Kazuyuki; Detailed map of the developed port of Yokohama; 1859. Image and original data courtesy of University of British Columbia Library, Rare Books and Special Collections

Artstor and the University of British Columbia are now making available approximately 350 Japanese maps and prints from the UBC Library’s Tokugawa collection.

The University of British Columbia Library (UBC Library) is one of the largest academic libraries in Canada and consistently ranks among the top university research libraries in North America. UBC Library has 14 branches and divisions, two campuses (Vancouver and Kelowna), one off-site hospital library, and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre – a multi-purpose teaching and learning facility. Continue Reading »

Paleontology staff posing with Fossil Shark Jaws. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History, Anthropology Department, American Museum of Natural History

Paleontology staff posing with Fossil Shark Jaws. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History, Anthropology Department, American Museum of Natural History

These photographs of six members of the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) Paleontology staff sitting inside the massive jaws of a Carcharocles megalodon are the stuff of nightmares—and, of course, just the thing for Shark Week.

Yet, as Brian Switek writes on ScienceBlogs, they’re the result of a miscalculation. “[T]he famous jaws were reconstructed by assuming that the teeth of the extinct shark would have had the same proportions to the jaw as in the living great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias), yielding a maw that would have fit a shark 100 feet long or more.”

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Missed our #ColorMyArtstor postcards at the ALA conference? Not to worry, you can print your own! Visit the Promoting Artstor section on our Support site and download the full set of five! There you will also find downloadable posters, bookmarks, brochures, and logos to let everyone know that your institution subscribes to Artstor.

LINKMAN4

Photographer: Robert Howlett | Isambard Kingdom Brunel, builder of the Great Eastern | ca. 1857-1858 | George Eastman House, eastmanhouse.org

Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

  • A new artist residency offers a month in a deserted island accessible only by boat or seaplane. Only joint applications from artist couples or two artists “willing to tolerate each other for the duration” will be accepted.
  • In previous Friday Links we told you about the world’s ugliest color and the world’s darkest black. This week we bring you the world’s newest blue.
  • Social media is shaping the way art is produced and shown, “perhaps even motivating artists and art institutions to feature work that looks attractive on digital platforms, even if it feels flimsy in real life.”
  • What does the Sleeping Hermaphrodite motif in Greco-Roman art tell us about art, sex, and good taste?

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Artstor is sharing two new collections of photographs by Barbara J. Anello: graffiti in Lower Manhattan in the 1980s and 90s, and Tibetan Buddhist art and architecture in Ladakh, India.

The photographs from Ladakh were exhibited at the Overseas Press Club in New York City and Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio in 1982. Continue Reading »

Artstor Arcades

Artstor Arcades

A zealous group of Artstor users have pitched in to collaboratively catalogue images from the D. James Dee Archive of contemporary art on our crowdsourcing site, arcades.artstor.org. Thanks to a combination of their expertise and a lot of internet sleuthing, 555 works are now a welcome addition to the D. James Dee Archive of Contemporary Art collection in the Artstor Digital Library. You can read more about Arcades on this blog, and about the Dee Archive in the New York Times.

At Arcades, participants are presented with images in a game environment where they are able to enter basic data, such as creator, title, date, medium, and exhibition history in order to accumulate points. In doing so, they “level-up” and progressively acquire titles ranging from “flâneur” and “connoisseur” to “apprentice” and “master” (all references to Walter Benjamin’s unfinished Arcades Project—more about that to come). At the time of our October 2015 launch we wondered what kind of results we would get. General crowdsourcing theory assumes that the more entries, the smarter the results. Would we secure enough participants? Would they feel compelled to return again and again?

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We invited Barbara Anello to tell us about her photographs of graffiti in Lower Manhattan, newly released in the Artstor Digital Library.

Title: Mural, 353 East 4th St between Aves C& D; Image ID: A

Robin Michaels and Kristen Reed; Mural, 353 East 4th St between Aves C & D; 1991; Graffiti Lower East Side Manhattan. Photograph © Barbara J. Anello

I photographed graffiti, stencil art, wall paintings, and murals on New York City streets during the 1980s and early ’90s in Lower Manhattan from about 14th Street south to Battery Park, and from the Hudson to the East Rivers, but generally in Soho, Noho, the Lower East Side, and “Alphabet City.”

At the time, Soho, where I lived, was still the neighborhood of artists and galleries, but rapidly gentrifying, forcing younger artists east and out. While much of the public art and graffiti was anonymous, the neighborhoods where I photographed embodied the “art world” of the time; these were the streets where artists worked and played, dealers bought and sold. So my photographs included works and writing by artists who became “art world” figures, such as Kenny Scharf and Keith Haring, by artists who built reputations in their neighborhoods as “writers” and social activists, as well as by dedicated, working artists who made statements independently on the walls of abandoned buildings or squats, intended for the people, for the neighborhood, outside the confines of commercial galleries.

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