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Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute (TJUPDI) (Master Plan, Regulatory Plan, Special Subject Study and Plan), Shanghai EXPO overviews; flags representing all of the countries represented at the EXPO, 2010, Shanghai EXPO, Shanghai, China. Image and original data provided by Art on File, artonfile.com

Shanghai Tongji Urban Planning & Design Institute (TJUPDI) (Master Plan, Regulatory Plan, Special Subject Study and Plan), Shanghai EXPO overviews; flags representing all of the countries represented at the EXPO, 2010, Shanghai EXPO, Shanghai, China. Image and original data provided by Art on File, artonfile.com

We are looking for students in all concentrations to become the voice of Artstor on their campus for the Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 semesters.

Who are we looking for?
Good communicators who know and use the Artstor Digital Library in their studies and who are passionate about improving education.

What you get: 

  • Work with professionals from Artstor’s New York office to develop valuable business skills, such as event planning, marketing, and public speaking.
  • Learn how to create effective social media campaigns, including writing blog posts, with campus-wide and international exposure.
  • Network at Artstor events with peers from institutions across the country.
  • Add Artstor to your resume and receive a certificate of completion at the end of the program.
  • Take part in special events and win prizes!

To apply, fill out this questionnaire. We will reach out to selected candidates for a brief interview.

Deadline is June 12, 2015. Applications will be reviewed as they are received and selected candidates will be notified by June 19, 2015.

We encourage administrators and faculty members to pass this on to their students.

LINKMAN4Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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Unknown (Dominican), Saint Nicholas of Bari's Hospital, Santo Domingo, Photographer: Anthony Stevens Acevedo, Image: 2009. Photograph copyright © CUNY Dominican Studies Institute. CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, First Blacks in the Americas collection.

Unknown (Dominican), Saint Nicholas of Bari’s Hospital, Santo Domingo, Photographer: Anthony Stevens Acevedo, Image: 2009. Photograph copyright © CUNY Dominican Studies Institute. CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, First Blacks in the Americas collection.

La Española, the island now divided into the Dominican Republic and the Republic of Haiti, existed first as a Spanish colony during the entire sixteenth century, when its population became the first one in the Americas with a majority of people of African descent. The Black ancestors of today’s Dominicans were the first to experience the dreadful transatlantic slave trade, and the first to offer organized resistance as soon as they landed in La Española. They were also the first to endure and survive all the varieties of enslaved labor and enslaved life, and the first to thrive and produce new generations of Afro-descendants born in the “New World.”

Sixteenth-Century La Española: Glimpses of the First Blacks in the Early Colonial Americas,” an exhibition opening this week at the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, presents images of manuscripts, transcriptions, translations, and photographs that tell the story of the earliest Black inhabitants of the Americas. The exhibit includes photographs of sites of the Dominican Republic’s colonial past by Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, Assistant Director of the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute at The City College of New York, the co-curator of the exhibit and a colonial historian. Dr. Lissette Acosta Corniel, CUNY DSI Post-Doctoral Fellow, is also a co-curator of the exhibit.

The show is an offshoot of “First Blacks in the Americas,” a long term CUNY DSI online project focusing on photographs that were part of the living environment of Black people in that territory during colonial times. Part of the collection is available in Shared Shelf Commons, an open-access library of digital media from Shared Shelf subscribers.

“Sixteenth-Century La Española: Glimpses of the First Blacks in the Early Colonial Americas” opens May 22 6:30–8:00 PM, and is on view through September 10, 2015 at the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, NAC Building Room 2/202, The City College of New York, 160 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10031.

LINKMAN4Some stories we’ve been reading (and watching) this week:

  • This week, Sally Mann’s memoir “Hold Still” was released. Charlie Rose led a rare interview with Mann on her photographs, family, and the places and memories that move her.
  • This art interview may be one of the last that requires human interlocutors. Smithsonian Magazine reports that computers are getting better than ever at identifying characteristics in works of art.
  • Over a third of American museum directors are at retirement age. What does the role of Museum Director mean today and what challenges will new leadership face? (That is, assuming they’re not all replaced by artificially-intelligent art robots first.)
  • And what better time to ask these questions than in the lead-up to International Museum Day on May 18th. See you in the galleries!

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LINKMAN4Some stories we’ve been reading this week:

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Éduard Manet, The Execution of Maximilian, ca. 1867-8. Photograph: ©The National Gallery, London

Éduard Manet, The Execution of Maximilian, ca. 1867-8. Photograph: © The National Gallery, London

Édouard Manet’s Luncheon on the Grass was the scandal of the year in France when it was exhibited in the 1863 Salon des Refusés, and Olympia was greeted with the same shock and indignation in the Paris Salon of 1865 (a journalist wrote, “If the canvas of the Olympia was not destroyed, it is only because of the precautions that were taken by the administration”). So selling tickets to show a new painting in America that was too controversial for France seemed a surefire way to get attention—and perhaps make a little money.

From 1867 to 1869, Édouard Manet had made some works depicting the execution of Emperor Maximilian in Mexico in 1867. But considering that Maximilian’s empire had collapsed after Napoleon III withdrew his support, it was not prudent to exhibit them in France while Napoleon remained in power.

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Eugène Atget, Bon Marche, 1926-27. George Eastman House

Eugène Atget, Bon Marche, 1926-27. George Eastman House

I recently came across the BBC adaptation of Émile Zola’s The Ladies’ Paradise and, as a self-confessed Francophile, couldn’t wait to begin watching it. A few episodes in, though, my enthusiasm dimmed when it became clear that the series didn’t faithfully follow the book. Zola’s novel is, at heart, an acerbic commentary on consumer culture, not a love story. Where Zola makes The Ladies’ Paradise, a department store, into a protagonist, the show instead relies on the budding romance between a shop girl and the store’s owner to drive it along. The Ladies’ Paradise is the backdrop of the story, but unfortunately not its focus.

Zola, often credited as one of the shrewdest observers of 19th-century French society, did not choose the department store arbitrarily as the setting for his novel. By the time he wrote The Ladies’ Paradise in the 1880s, the department store had become one of the most iconic features of modern Parisian life.

Gustave Eiffel; Louis Auguste Boileau, Le Bon Marché, 1876. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Gustave Eiffel; Louis Auguste Boileau, Le Bon Marché, 1876. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

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