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Archive for the ‘American Art’ Category

We invited Barbara Anello to tell us about her photographs of graffiti in Lower Manhattan, newly released in the Artstor Digital Library.

Title: Mural, 353 East 4th St between Aves C& D; Image ID: A

Robin Michaels and Kristen Reed; Mural, 353 East 4th St between Aves C & D; 1991; Graffiti Lower East Side Manhattan. Photograph © Barbara J. Anello

I photographed graffiti, stencil art, wall paintings, and murals on New York City streets during the 1980s and early ’90s in Lower Manhattan from about 14th Street south to Battery Park, and from the Hudson to the East Rivers, but generally in Soho, Noho, the Lower East Side, and “Alphabet City.”

At the time, Soho, where I lived, was still the neighborhood of artists and galleries, but rapidly gentrifying, forcing younger artists east and out. While much of the public art and graffiti was anonymous, the neighborhoods where I photographed embodied the “art world” of the time; these were the streets where artists worked and played, dealers bought and sold. So my photographs included works and writing by artists who became “art world” figures, such as Kenny Scharf and Keith Haring, by artists who built reputations in their neighborhoods as “writers” and social activists, as well as by dedicated, working artists who made statements independently on the walls of abandoned buildings or squats, intended for the people, for the neighborhood, outside the confines of commercial galleries.

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The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is pleased to collaborate with Artstor to make available approximately 1,000 images of works from the Foundation’s collections in its Digital Library. Spanning the breadth and depth of the collections, works from all aspects of the collections including paintings, drawings, maps, prints, textiles, ceramics, glass, metals, furniture, numismatics, and mechanical arts and arms will be shown, effective May 15, 2016.

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Elizabeth Catlett; Dancing, 1990. Image and original data provided by Amistad Research Center, Tulane University. Art © Estate of Elizabeth Catlett / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. This work of art is protected by copyright and/or related rights and may not be reproduced in any manner, except as permitted under the Artstor Digital Library Terms and Conditions of Use, without the prior express written authorization of VAGA, 350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2820, New York, NY 10118. Tel.: 212-736-6666, fax: 212-736-6767, email: info@vagarights.com.

Elizabeth Catlett; Dancing, 1990. Image and original data provided by Amistad Research Center, Tulane University. Art © Estate of Elizabeth Catlett / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. This work of art is protected by copyright and/or related rights and may not be reproduced in any manner, except as permitted under the Artstor Digital Library Terms and Conditions of Use, without the prior express written authorization of VAGA, 350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2820, New York, NY 10118. Tel.: 212-736-6666, fax: 212-736-6767, email: info@vagarights.com.

Artstor and the Amistad Research Center are now making available in the Digital Library nearly 300 images from the Center’s art collection, focusing on works by Harlem Renaissance masters from the Harmon Foundation.

The collection in Artstor includes Jacob Lawrence’s The Life of Toussaint L’Ouverture, the artist’s first historical series, as well as the work of many other important African American artists such as Romare Bearden, Hale Woodruff, Aaron Douglas, and Elizabeth Catlett.

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nyhsLogoArtstor and the New-York Historical Society are collaborating to release approximately 2,000 images of paintings and sculptures from the museum’s collection and 20,000 images from the library collection in the Digital Library.

The New-York Historical Society, comprising a library and museum, was founded in 1804. The museum, which is the oldest in the city, tells the history of New York and the United States through material culture and art. It has rich holdings in the decorative arts, painting, sculpture, and drawing, as well as a collection of assorted historical artifacts. Its art holdings consist of more than 1.6 million world-class works, including a collection of Hudson River School paintings, iconic genre and history paintings, a variety of American portraits, all 435 of John James Audubon’s extant preparatory watercolors for Birds of America, and 800 works of American representational sculpture. The museum also holds much of sculptor Elie Nadelman’s legendary American folk art collection, which includes furniture and household accessories, as well as paintings, toys, weathervanes, sculptural woodcarvings, and chalkware.

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Colonial WilliamsburgArtstor and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation are collaborating to make available approximately 1,000 images of works from the Foundation’s collections in the Digital Library.

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation operates the world’s largest living history museum in Williamsburg, Virginia—the restored 18th-century capital of Britain’s largest, wealthiest, and most populous outpost of empire in the New World. Here it interprets the origins of the idea of America in the years before and during the American Revolution. The story of Colonial Williamsburg’s Revolutionary City tells how diverse peoples, having different and sometimes conflicting ambitions, evolved into a society that valued liberty and equality.

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Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Easter is around the corner, and with it comes the inevitable barrage of images of the Easter bunny. The strange thing is that the only mentions of rabbits in the Bible are prohibitions against eating them in the Old Testament. So what gives?

The underlying idea is that rabbits are connected to the idea of rebirth—not only do they reproduce prodigiously, at one time they were believed to reproduce asexually. The connection of rabbits to rebirth also occurs in non-Christian societies: The Rabbit in the Moon (instead of our Man in the Moon) is a familiar symbol in Asia, and was part of Aztec legend, tying the idea of rabbits to a “rebirth” every night. But other qualities of rabbits and hares also get highlighted in folklore, including their mischievous side, playing the role of cunning tricksters in Native American and Central African mythologies. (more…)

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artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Garth Greenan Gallery have collaborated to release 20 images of works by contemporary artist Howardena Pindell in the Digital Library.

Howardena Pindell (b.1943) explores issues of racism, feminism, violence, slavery, and exploitation through the language of abstraction. She is known for her use of unconventional materials in her otherwise formalist paintings, including string, perfume, glitter, and postcards. Pindell also occasionally works in video.

Pindell was a founding member of feminist art collective AIR Galleries in 1972, and her art has been exhibited at the Studio Museum in Harlem, Walker Art Center, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Pindell’s work is included in the permanent collections of MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Yale University Art Museum. (more…)

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