Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Architecture & City Planning’ Category

John Reps, Monpazier

John Reps, Monpazier, 1951 (founded 1284)

In the 13th century, southwestern France gave birth to several hundred new planned towns, partly to replace villages destroyed in the Albigensian Crusades and partly to revivify a stagnating economy and tame areas of wilderness¹. Some were designed as fortress communities, while others were laid out as simple agricultural villages. The great majority, however, had a different function. Known as bastides, they were created as market towns with the aim of concentrating the population in secure places for ease of administration while returning a profit to their sponsors. Their founders were the great feudal lords of the region: kings, dukes, counts, and viscounts.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Rem D. Koolhaas, Two Libraries for Jussieu University

Rem D. Koolhaas, Two Libraries for Jussieu University (first floor section and condensed section), 1992. Data source: Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, Columbia University and Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University. © 2014 OMA AMO / Beeldrecht / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Artstor, the Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP), and the Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library are now sharing approximately 10,000 images of architectural plans and sections and related materials in the Digital Library.

The collection, which is projected to include 20,000 images, is based on GSAPP’s history of modern architecture curriculum and covers the history of modern buildings, focusing primarily on 20th-century modernism, with a few earlier and later projects spanning from 1871 to 2013. Comprising 1,000 projects from 44 countries, the majority of them of built works, the Plans and Sections project also includes documentation of unbuilt projects and of competitions such as the Chicago Tribune Tower and the Lenin Library. This collaboration makes this rich body of visual material and related scholarship available online for the first time

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), De Rotterdam; overview showing the contrast between the old warehouses and the building. Image and original data provided by Art on File; artonfile.com

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), De Rotterdam; overview showing the contrast between the old warehouses and the building. Image and original data provided by Art on File; artonfile.com

Artstor and ART on FILE have released approximately 1,600 new direct-digital capture photographs of architecture, built environment projects, and landscape architecture in Rotterdam, the Netherlands’ architectural capital, in the Digital Library. The second-largest city in the country, Rotterdam offers an impressive overview of modern architecture from the last 100 years.

Sites and locations documented include Arts Center Katenbrecht, Beurs World Trade Center, Cube Houses, Van Nelle Factory, Library de Boekenberg, Erasmus Medical Center, The Rotterdam Tramway Network (Rotterdams Tramnet), Rotterdam Centraal Station, Scheepvaart en Transport College, Schiecentrale/RTV Rijnmond, The New Institute (NAI), Waternet Rotterdam, Wilhelminaplein Subway Station , World Port Center, and more.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Palmyra; theatre exterior from south. Date of photograph: 1977. Image and original data provided by Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom.

Palmyra; theatre exterior from south. Date of photograph: 1977. Image and original data provided by Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom.

Photographs released by the militant group Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, have confirmed the destruction of the ancient Temple of Baalshamin in Palmyra, Syria. Until now, the ancient city of Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage site, contained remarkably well-preserved structures built by the Romans nearly 2,000 years ago, making it one of the most important archaeological sites in the region. The news of the Temple’s destruction was preceded by the horrifying news that Khaled Asaad, the 83-year-old chief of the city’s antiquities department, was publicly beheaded. While the seemingly endless loss of lives must be our primary concern, the destruction of the Temple of Baalshamin is shocking for its attempt to erase Syria and the region’s rich, multicultural history. The New York Times quoted Irina Bokova, the director general of UNESCO, saying “The art and architecture of Palmyra, standing at the crossroads of several civilizations, is a symbol of the complexity and wealth of the Syrian identity and history. Extremists seek to destroy this diversity and richness, and I call on the international community to stand united against this persistent cultural cleansing.”

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Renzo Piano Building Workshop, The Art Institute of Chicago: The Modern Wing, 1999-2009 | Image provided by Renzo Piano Building Workshop | © Rpbw, Renzo Piano Building Workshop | Photograph by Nic Lehoux.

Renzo Piano Building Workshop, The Art Institute of Chicago: The Modern Wing, 1999-2009. Image provided by Renzo Piano Building Workshop, © Rpbw, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, Photograph by Nic Lehoux.

Artstor and the Renzo Piano Building Workshop are now sharing more than 120 additional images of works of architecture designed by Piano and the Workshop in the Digital Library.

The images in this release include two LACMA expansions: the Broad Contemporary Art Museum and The Resnick Pavilion in Los Angeles; the Central Saint Giles Court mixed-use development in London; the Gatehouse and Monastery in Ronchamp, France; the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum renovation and expansion in Boston; The Shard (London Bridge Tower) in London; the Auditorium del Parco in L’ Aquila, Italy; MUSE – Museo delle Scienze and the Quartiere delle Albere district in Trento, Italy; the Kimbell Art Museum expansion in Fort Worth, Texas; the Pathé Foundation in Paris; and the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art in Oslo. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Artstor has recently released more than 1,100 photographs of Central Park from the Foundation for Landscape Studies in the Digital Library. We celebrated the occasion by speaking with Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who founded the organization in 2005 and serves as its president.

Ms. Rogers is a pivotal figure in the history of Central Park. She was appointed the Park’s administrator in 1979, charged with overseeing all aspects of daily operations. She was instrumental in founding the Central Park Conservancy in 1980, and she guided the Park’s extraordinary restoration. Rogers led the Conservancy as president until 1996, and she is now a life trustee. Her influence extends far beyond New York City, and she is frequently consulted by groups in other cities and countries desiring to form park conservancies modeled on the one for Central Park.

After stepping down from the presidency of the Central Park Conservancy, Rogers founded the Cityscape Institute. She subsequently created the Garden History and Landscape Studies curriculum at the Bard Graduate Center in 2002. She is the author of several books, including The Forests and Wetlands of New York City (1971), Rebuilding Central Park: A Management and Restoration Plan (1987), Landscape Design: A Cultural and Architectural History (2001), Writing the Garden: A Literary Conversation Across Two Centuries (2011), and Learning Las Vegas: Portrait of a Northern New Mexican Place (2013).

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Landscape architect: Gertrude Jekyll, and architect: Edwin Lutyens, | Le Bois des Moutiers | Image and original data provided by the Foundation for Landscape Studies | © Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Foundation for Landscape Studies

Landscape architect: Gertrude Jekyll, and architect: Edwin Lutyens, | Le Bois des Moutiers | Image and original data provided by the Foundation for Landscape Studies | © Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Foundation for Landscape Studies

The Artstor Digital Library and the Foundation for Landscape Studies are now sharing more than 1,100 additional images, the large majority of them documenting the renovation of New York City’s Central Park in the 1980s.

This brings the collection’s total in the Digital Library to 8,000 images from around the world. These images provide an overview of landscape studies, encompassing all cultural landscapes, including gardens, parks, cities, suburbs, rural areas, and the humanized wilderness. A subset of the collection consists of engravings from rare books dating from the 16th through early 20th century.

The Foundation for Landscape Studies is a nonprofit with a mission to foster an active understanding of the importance of place in human life. To this end, the foundation initiates collaborative projects with other organizations, institutions, and individuals that promote and advance landscape history and historic landscape design, theory, and practice. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 741 other followers