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Archive for the ‘Release’ Category

The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (Harvard University) is contributing more than 95,000 additional images of objects from their permanent collection to Artstor, bringing the total selection to approximately 143,000. The collection and its representation in Artstor, featuring African, Native North American, Pre-Columbian,  European, Oceanic, and Asian cultures is virtually encyclopedic. The current contribution further enhances a rich selection.

A sampling of a single artifact — the mask — across time and place illustrates the scope of the collection: from an Aztec stone effigy c. 1500 to its  Panamanian ceramic counterpart, a Tlingit copper version of the mid 1800s, and a Mohawk corn husk Spirit image worn in ritual dances. Likewise, the juxtaposition of similar objects underscores the aesthetic and spiritual differences between cultures: a Communication Artifact (a wooden bird) from Rwanda and a Pre-Columbian Gold bird-shaped ornament from Chiriqui, Panama. Nonetheless, form, function, and even materials appear to be all but replicated in two versions of a beaded collar, objects that are geographically and culturally disparate, one from the Masai in Kenya and the other from the Mojave of California.

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Magic zoomorphic statuette, dog. Congo, Loango. Before 1892. Musée du Quai Branly. Photo: Hughes Dubois. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.

Magic zoomorphic statuette, dog. Congo, Loango. Before 1892. Musée du Quai Branly. Photo: Hughes Dubois. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.

The Réunion des Musées Nationaux (RMN), and Art Resource are contributing nearly 1,400 images of works from the Musée du quai Branly-Jacques Chirac to the Artstor Digital Library. The selection of images available in Artstor from this collection of global, non-Western art from pre-history to the present centers on the outstanding African collections, and also includes a selection of Aboriginal paintings from Australia, as well as other varied works. 

The diversity of African cultures represented is illustrated by a limited sample: a Mask Headdress with a Shark from the Ijo people of Nigeria; a Magic Zoomorphic Statuette, before 1892,  from the Kingdom of Loango (now part of the Republic of the Congo); and a panel from the Gate of the Royal Palace at Abomey, c. 1889, Kingdom of Dahomey, Benin. The selection in Artstor also includes brilliant examples from other cultures such as a feather Poncho from the Inca, c. 1500, and a tiny animal/man hybrid Figurine from the Inuit. (more…)

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Transformation mask. Gitanyow, Kitwancool?, British Columbia. c. 1870 CE. © UBC Museum of Anthropology. Photographed by Kyla Bailey.

Transformation mask. Gitanyow, Kitwancool?, British Columbia. c. 1870 CE. © UBC Museum of Anthropology. Photographed by Kyla Bailey.

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia and Artstor have released approximately 75,000 images of art and cultural objects from the museum’s  permanent collection. Highlights of the collection illustrate the diverse and creative  heritage of the Indigenous peoples of Canada, as exemplified by a Transformation Mask of the Gitanyow people c. 1870, a Haida Dance Tunic, and standing Bear from the North West Coast of British Columbia.  (more…)

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Ansel Adams. Yosemite Valley, Rain and Mist, Yosemite National Park, California. 1940. Image and original data provided by Center for Creative Photography. ©The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

Ansel Adams. Yosemite Valley, Rain and Mist, Yosemite National Park, California. 1940. Image and original data provided by Center for Creative Photography. ©The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.

The Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona has made available nearly 36,000 photographs in the Artstor Digital Library.

The Center is recognized as one of the world’s finest academic art museums and study centers for the history of photography. It opened in 1975, following a meeting between the University President John Schaefer and Ansel Adams. According to Schaefer, “No other universities were really collecting photography, or looking at it as an art form or social document.” Beginning with the archives of five living master photographers—Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock, Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, and Frederick Sommer—the collection has grown to include 239 archival collections. Among these are some of the most recognizable names in 20th century North American photography: W. Eugene Smith, Lola Alvarez Bravo, Edward Weston, and Garry Winogrand. (more…)

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Condé Nast is providing nearly 10,000 additional images to the Artstor Digital Library, bringing their total contribution to approximately 33,000. The release encompasses images from the Condé Nast Archive of Photography, selections from the Fairchild Photo Service, and signature cartoons from The New Yorker. Highlights of the new release include striking and innovative images from Vogue photographers Clifford Coffin and Louise Dahl-Wolfe, and ravishing food stills by Romulo Yanes.

The Condé Nast Archive is a leading repository of photography, featuring fashion, celebrity, and lifestyle shots from publications such as Glamour, Vanity Fair, and Vogue, dating from the 1890s to the present. The glamour and star power of fashion is represented in the commercial work of Edward Steichen and Horst P. Horst, through to contemporary takes from the runways of international style capitals, including the work of Patrick Demarchelier. The Fairchild Photo Service, comprised of more than three million photos gathered over six decades, is the fashion world’s preeminent image gallery. The New Yorker‘s cartoons are legendary for their incisive wit and for shedding light on the lives and foibles of the city’s dwellers from the Depression through to the era of “fake news.” The magazine’s cartoonists include renowned figures like Peter Arno, Roz Chast, Otto Soglow, William Steig, James Thurber, and Gahan Wilson. (more…)

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Magnum Photos and Artstor are now sharing more than 35,000 additional images in the Digital Library, bringing our total to approximately 116,000* of the world’s most recognized photographs. The new release spans the globe from Alaska to the Amazon and Oman to the Arctic Circle.

Among the highlights are black and white shots of daily life in Europe by Raymond Depardon; Middle Eastern tensions and traditions observed by Abbas; elegant staged portraits from Marilyn to Einstein by Philippe Halsman; Martine Franck’s images of both ordinary people and luminaries; a vibrant sequence in India by Alessandra Sanguinetti; and Thomas Hoepker’s striking painterly landscapes. The collection also documents present-day concerns with photographs from geopolitical hotspots like Fukushima, Donetsk, and Aleppo. (more…)

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Jeremy Horner. Devotees at the Krishna Temple of Shriji, during Lathmar Holi. 2011. © Jeremy Horner / Panos Pictures. Image and original data provided by Panos Pictures.

Jeremy Horner. Devotees at the Krishna Temple of Shriji, during Lathmar Holi. 2011. © Jeremy Horner / Panos Pictures. Image and original data provided by Panos Pictures.

Panos Pictures is contributing 1,511 additional photographs of contemporary global issues to the Artstor Digital Library, increasing our holdings from their archive to more than 33,000 images. Recent materials document some of the most significant events and forces of the last decade: the refugee crisis as it plays out in camps in Greece, Kurdistan, and Myanmar; the effects of Ebola; and the worldwide implications of climate change and drought.

Panos Pictures was founded as a photo agency in 1986 by the current director Adrian Evans (it was originally linked to Panos London, an organization that promoted the freedom of the media and proliferation of information and debate in developing countries). In 2011, the 25th anniversary of the agency, Evans expressed its ethic: “We believe in the photography of ideas. Not content with merely witnessing, Panos photographers seek out stories that matter with the aim of interpreting rather than simply recording. We are not afraid to take a position on current events or contemporary issues and offer perspectives that challenge commonly held assumptions.” The name Panos, a classical Greek term meaning beacon, defines the mission. For more than three decades Panos Pictures has worked with the commercial and nonprofit sectors, to campaign and to communicate with new and diverse audiences through a range of media including exhibitions, multimedia, books and video, and long-term documentary projects. (more…)

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