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Archive for the ‘Drawings and Watercolors’ Category

The Codex Mendoza, early 1540s

The ‘Codex Mendoza’, pt. I.; fol. 002r, early 1540s. Image and original data provided by the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. Copyright Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

As we built our AP® Art History Teaching Resources over the last three years, we found ourselves fascinated by some of the newly required content. Over the next year, we will offer periodic webinars on some of these works of art and architecture; the first one will be on the Colonial Americas.

The art of the Colonial Americas is represented in the curriculum framework by six distinct objects. One of these is the “Codex Mendoza,” named for the first viceroy of Mexico (1535-1550), who commissioned it c. 1542 (contributed to the Artstor Digital Library by the Bodleian Library). Intended as a gift to Charles V, the manuscript never reached the monarch.

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Jean Lurcat Celui qui aime ecrit sur les murs [One who loves writes on the walls], ca. 1924. © Smithsonian Institution, © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Jean Lurcat Celui qui aime ecrit sur les murs [One who loves writes on the walls], ca. 1924. © Smithsonian Institution, © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Artstor and the Smithsonian’s Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum have just released more than 8,200 images from the permanent collection in the Digital Library.

The Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum is the only museum in the United States devoted exclusively to historic and contemporary design. The Museum presents compelling perspectives on the impact of design on daily life through active educational and curatorial programming. (more…)

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Tlingit artist, leggings, ca. 1880. Image and original data from Portland Art Museum.

Tlingit artist, leggings, ca. 1880. Image and original data from Portland Art Museum.

Artstor and the Portland Art Museum are now sharing more than 2,300 images of artworks, with a particular focus on Native American and Northwest art.

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Vassily Kandinsky, Impression V (Park), 1911. Musée National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Vassily Kandinsky, Impression V (Park), 1911. Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Through a collaboration with the Réunion des Musées Nationaux (RMN) and Art Resource, Artstor is now sharing more than 5,100 additional images of works in the permanent collections of French national and regional museums in the Digital Library.

This brings the total of RMN images in the Digital Library to more than 12,000. The images come from the archives of the Agence photographique de la RMN, which encompass the collections of 28 museums such as the Musée du Louvre, the Musée d’Orsay, and the Musée National d’Art Moderne-Centre Georges Pompidou.

This release is composed of an outstanding selection of modern art, including paintings by Balthus, Francis Bacon, Pierre Bonnard, Georges Braque, Natalia Goncharova, Marc Chagall, Tamara de Lempicka, Fernand Léger, André Masson, René Magritte, and Francis Picabia; sculptures by Henri Matisse, Alexander Calder, André Derain, Jean Dubuffet, Niki de Saint-Phalle, and Joseph Beuys; works on paper by Pierre Alechinsky, Antonin Artaud, Edgar Degas, Paul Klee, and Victor Hugo; installations by Louise Bourgeois and Martial Raysse; rarely-seen reconstructions of architectural models by Kazimir Malevich, furniture designed by Le Corbusier, and documentary and self-portrait photographs by Constantin Brancusi; as well as more than 100 works by Vassily Kandinsky. The release also features thousands of ancient to medieval artworks from Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

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Francis Newton Souza, Untitled, 1963. © Estate of F.N. Souza © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS

Francis Newton Souza, Untitled, 1963. © Estate of F.N. Souza © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS

Artstor and the Francis Newton Souza Estate have released approximately 900 images of the celebrated Indian painter’s artwork in the Artstor Digital Library.

Born in Saligoa, Goa, India in 1924, Francis Newton Souza became the first of India’s post-Independence modern painters to achieve high recognition in the West. His works can be found in major museum collections around the world, including Tate Britain and Tate Modern, the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Birmingham Museum of Art, the Wakefield Art Gallery, the Haifa Museum in Israel, the Museum of Biblical Art in Dallas, Texas, the National Gallery of Modern Art in India, the National Gallery of Victoria in Australia, and the Glenbarra Museum in Japan. According to Indian art historian Yashodhara Dalmia, “At the heart of Souza’s creativity was the belief that society’s destructive aspects shouldn’t be suppressed, they should be aired and confronted.”

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Bruce Eric Kaplan, "Where does he get all his ideas?" Condé Nast; cartoonbank.licensestream.com. New Yorker Cartoons: Kaplan, Bruce Eric/The New Yorker Collection; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

Bruce Eric Kaplan, “Where does he get all his ideas?” Condé Nast; cartoonbank.licensestream.com. New Yorker Cartoons: Kaplan, Bruce Eric/The New Yorker Collection; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

Artstor has released approximately 18,000 additional images from Condé Nast in the Digital Library, including nearly 3,000 cartoons from The New Yorker and 15,000 fashion photographs from the Fairchild Photo Service.

Vivienne Westwood Red Label Fall 2013 Ready to Wear. Photographer: Giovanni Giannoni. Condé Nast; condenaststore.com | Fairchild Photo Service; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

Vivienne Westwood Red Label Fall 2013 Ready to Wear. Photographer: Giovanni Giannoni. Condé Nast; condenaststore.com | Fairchild Photo Service; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

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Sandro Botticelli, Primavera; Allegory of Spring, c. 1478, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by ©SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Sandro Botticelli, Primavera; Allegory of Spring, c. 1478, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by ©SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Kenyon Cox (1856-1919) might now be best remembered for his murals in the Library of Congress, as well as in the state capitol buildings of Des Moines, St. Paul, and Madison, but he was also a respected writer and influential teacher. In 1911, he delivered a series of lectures on painting at the Art Institute of Chicago, later published as The Classic Point of View. His accessible writing style and his infectious enthusiasm for the Old Masters still speak to us today. Following is an excerpt from his lecture on the importance of drawing, focusing on the work of Botticelli and Michelangelo.

Drawing is a great expressional art and deals with beauty and significance, not with mere fact. Its great masters are the greatest artists that ever lived, and high attainment in it has always been rarer than high attainment in color. Its tools are the line and so much of light and shade as is necessary to convey the sense of bulk and modelling, anything more being something added for its own beauty and expressiveness, not a part of the sources of the draftsman. Its aims are, first, to develop in the highest degree the abstract beauty and significance possessed by lines in themselves, more or less independently of representation; second, to express with the utmost clearness and force the material significance of objects and, especially, of the human body. According as one or the other of these aims predominates we have one or the other of the two great schools into which draftsmen may be divided. These schools may be typified by the greatest masters of each, the school of Botticelli, or the school of pure line; the school of Michelangelo, or the school of significant form. Between these lie all the law and the prophets. Of course no artist ever belonged entirely and exclusively to either school. It is always a matter of balance and the predominance of interest. Even a Botticelli tried to put some significant form inside his beautiful lines, and even Michelangelo gave thought to the abstract beauty of his lines apart from the significant form they bounded. (more…)

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