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Archive for the ‘Drawings and Watercolors’ Category

artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the University of Puget Sound are collaborating to release 150 images of works by the painter, activist, and writer Abby Williams Hill in the Digital Library.

Abby Williams Hill (b.1861) is best known for her commissions for the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railways. Her railway works were exhibited at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, the Lewis & Clark Exposition in Portland in 1905, the Jamestown Tricentennial in 1907, and the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle in 1909. These pieces, along with her other landscapes, offer a rich portrait of the natural landscape of the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The accompanying archive of papers and personal materials offer insight into Hill’s life and provides an example of the American experience between the Civil War and World War II.

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artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Garth Greenan Gallery are collaborating to release 20 images of works by the artist Howardena Pindell in the Digital Library.

Howardena Pindell (b.1943) explores issues of racism, feminism, violence, slavery, and exploitation through the language of abstraction. She is known for her use of unconventional materials in her otherwise formalist paintings, including string, perfume, glitter, and postcards. Pindell also occasionally works in video.

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Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.;www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; http://www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

“Was this the face that launched a thousand ships?”

So asks the title character in Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus upon seeing the radiant ghost of Helen of Troy. Marlowe was not the only artist to be captivated by Helen and her fabled beauty. Indeed, for millennia, painters, sculptors, poets and playwrights have been inspired by her story.

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Théodore Géricault, Scene from the Race of the Barberi Horses. Image and original data provided by the Art Gallery of Ontario; ago.net. Image © Art Gallery of Ontario.

Théodore Géricault, Scene from the Race of the Barberi Horses. Image and original data provided by the Art Gallery of Ontario; ago.net. Image © Art Gallery of Ontario.

Artstor and the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) are now sharing more than 300 images from the Gallery’s permanent collection in the Digital Library. The AGO will eventually contribute selections from their Prints and Drawings collection, which covers the history of Western drawing and printmaking from 1400 to the present, as they undertake a major digitization project for this curatorial department.

Thanks to Artstor’s agreement with SODRAC, the principal society for reproduction rights in Canada representing major international and Canadian artists, works by contemporary artists in the AGO’s Collection in SODRAC’s repertoire will be available to the more than 1,500 institutions that subscribe to the Artstor Digital Library worldwide, including over 60 colleges, universities, museums, and schools in Canada. (more…)

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Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D'Arthur; "La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard", 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley, Le Morte D’Arthur; “La Beale Isoud at Joyous Gard”, 1893. Image and catalog data provided by Allan T. Kohl, Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Aubrey Beardsley was born on August 21, 1872. Despite dying of tuberculosis at the young age of twenty-five in 1898, the artist managed to have a brilliant career full of controversy and scandal. He shot to fame with his illustrations for Thomas Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur in 1893, and then became notorious for his illustrations for Oscar Wilde’s Salome (1894).

Recurring images throughout his career follow two seemingly incongruous paths. There is an emphasis on sly, clever wickedness; a youthful disregard for propriety; and an interest in the perverse and profane. Overlapping imagery of melancholia and death lead the second path. These two broad and inconsistent currents each render distinct images of the same artist who was drawn to scandal and associated himself with the 1890s Symbolist crowd often scorned by the arts elite and general public alike.

The images in this post come from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and George Eastman House collections in the Artstor Digital Library.

Elizabeth Darocha Berenz

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Oliverio Toscani, Double Portrait of Andy Warhol, 1974, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Photo © MFAH, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Oliverio Toscani, Double Portrait of Andy Warhol, 1974, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Photo © MFAH, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / BILDKUNST, Bonn

Artstor and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston have released more than 5,000 images from the permanent collection in the Digital Library.

The images in this release include works by artists such as Diane Arbus, Alexander Archipenko, Robert Arneson, Uta Barth, George Condo, Delacroix, Dan Graham, William Klein, Dorothea Lange, Annie Leibovitz, Roy Lichenstein, Brice Marden, Claes Oldenburg, José Clemente Orozco, Irving Penn, José Guadalupe Posada, Frederic Remington, Gerhard Richter, Diego Rivera, Milton Rogovin, Ed Ruscha, Andres Serrano, Jennifer Steinkamp, Rufino Tamayo, James Turrell, Peter Voulkos, Joel Peter Witkin, Minor White, Rachel Whiteread, Frank Lloyd Wright, and many more.

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On July 14, we celebrated the storming of the Bastille, the momentous day in 1789 that marked the beginning of the French Revolution, and the beginning of the end of the monarchy.

While it is a day revered by the citoyens of France, it has come to symbolize the declining fortunes of the king and his once celebrated and later reviled wife, Marie Antoinette.

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine

Anonymous French printmaker | Coiffure of Independence or The Triumph of Liberty | c. 1778 | Musée national de la coopération franco-américaine | Photographer: Gérard Blot. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y. artres.com

History has revised the narrative of the Queen whose apocryphal utterance “let them eat cake” allegedly flaunted her disregard for her starving subjects.

Beginning with the nineteenth-century biography by the Goncourt brothers, and the insightful study of Zweig (1932), and culminating in recent portrayals, notably Coppola’s film of 2006, and Thomas’ chronicle of Marie Antoinette’s final days, Farewell, My Queen (published in 2003 and released as a film in 2012), characterizations of the monarch have softened and become more nuanced.

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