Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Humanities & Social Sciences’ Category

Jason Larkin | Sobhi Saleh, surrounded by Muslim Brotherhood volunteers and members, tries to organise a campaigning session in his local constituency of al-Ramal; 2010 |© Jason Larkin / Panos Pictures; www.panos.co.uk

Jason Larkin | Sobhi Saleh, surrounded by Muslim Brotherhood volunteers and members, tries to organise a campaigning session in his local constituency of al-Ramal; 2010 |© Jason Larkin / Panos Pictures; http://www.panos.co.uk

Panos Pictures and Artstor have collaborated to share an additional 1,000 images of contemporary global affairs in the Digital Library.

Panos specializes in documenting critical social issues as well as stories beyond the contemporary media landscape. Urban development in Turkey, deforestation of the Amazon rainforest, records of extinct and endangered species at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, a barbershop in Nigeria, and Charlie Chaplin impersonators in India are among the thousands of compelling places and people now discoverable via Artstor. The Panos Profile includes more than twenty photographers working in the North America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America. Dozens of additional photographers comprise the Panos network to create one of the most comprehensive visual records of international contemporary life. Images documenting urban and rural communities, landscape and the built environment, peace and conflict tell the story of the ties between globalized and regional life.

For over twenty years, Panos Pictures has been working with the commercial and nonprofit sectors, actively using photography to campaign and communicate through a range of media to new and diverse audiences. Recognizing that photography is more than pictures on a page, Panos has engaged in all forms of visual communication, producing exhibitions, multimedia, and video, as well as long-term documentary projects. Panos photographers seek out stories that matter and bring an unparalleled understanding and awareness of the sensitivities and ethical dimensions of the issues and areas they document. (more…)

Read Full Post »

logo-arasArtstor is collaborating with the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism to release 17,000 images documenting mythology, symbols and rituals from different time periods and geographic locations in the Digital Library.

The images in Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS) explore the universality of certain iconographies and themes, illustrating commonalities in the ways human beings across the world have thought about and represented different phenomena. Each image includes commentary that points to its unique history and contextualizes it within larger patterns and historical developments. The collection supports interdisciplinary humanities research, research on the meaning of images in psychoanalysis and dreams, and provides support for designers searching for pictorial inspiration. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Mummy of Ukhhotep, Middle Kingdom

Egypt, Mummy of Ukhhotep, Middle Kingdom, ca. 1981-1802 B.C. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Come tomorrow evening, droves of miniature monsters will haunt our neighborhoods, jack-o-lantern-shaped candy bowls in tow. Amongst the groups of trick-or-treaters, though, one spooky creature will likely be absent: the mummy, which, despite being the star of many a horror film, never seems to be a Halloween costume favorite.

My guess as to why the mummy costume has never attained the cult status of, for example, the ghost is a purely pragmatic one. Dressing up as a mummy is a difficult task; cutting eyeholes into a white sheet is pretty straightforward. This is a fact that my own failed childhood attempt at dressing up as a mummy—which ended in my mother watching the rolls of gauze bandages she had dutifully wrapped around me immediately unravel—confirms.

An Egyptologist, however, might answer this question differently. For though the mummy of horror cinema is unrestful and vengeful, rising from the tomb to wreak havoc upon the living, in reality mummification was nothing more than a sophisticated burial ritual, meant to help lead the deceased to a peaceful afterlife.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Paul-Émile Bécat, André  Gide,  1919, La Bibliothèque de l'INHA-collections Jacques Doucet. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

Paul-Émile Bécat, André Gide, 1919, La Bibliothèque de l’INHA-collections Jacques Doucet. Image and original data provided by Réunion des Musées Nationaux / Art Resource, N.Y.; artres.com

This year’s Nobel Prize winners in literature are set to be announced next week. Despite there being no public information about the candidates–the list is kept secret for fifty years after each award–U.K. bookmaker Ladbrokes has been busy taking bets.

While we’re as much in the dark as to who will win as anyone else, we can offer a list of all the previous winners, along with links to dozens of their portraits (or, in the case of Thomas Mann, to a photo of his hands) in the Artstor Digital Library.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates, 1787, The Metropolitan Museum of Art . Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Jacques-Louis David, The Death of Socrates, 1787, The Metropolitan Museum of Art . Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Introduction to Philosophy
Carl Hammer, Lecturer, Communication Studies, University of MN, Twin Cities

This curriculum guide introduces the student to the basic problems, methods and theories of western philosophy.  It looks at issues in the theory of reality, knowledge and ethics. This includes some of the main problems in the philosophy of mind, religion, and action. It begins with a look at some of the tools and methods of philosophy, such as deduction, induction, and definition. Images allow students to envision real and imaginary examples of the problems and theories in philosophy, as well as provide an engaging visual “anchor” to aid in their retention. 

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Alexandria, Map, 1619 | Image and original data provided by Bryn Mawr College

Alexandria, Map, 1619 | Image and original data provided by Bryn Mawr College

Navigating the tremendous number of images in the Artstor Digital Library can be daunting, particularly to those in fields outside of art history. Where to start looking for images for, say, an Introduction to Philosophy class? To address that hurdle, we are introducing curriculum guides – collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.;www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Gavin Hamilton, Venus Presenting Helen to Paris, Museo di Roma. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; http://www.artres.com; scalarchives.com, Rights (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

“Was this the face that launched a thousand ships?”

So asks the title character in Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus upon seeing the radiant ghost of Helen of Troy. Marlowe was not the only artist to be captivated by Helen and her fabled beauty. Indeed, for millennia, painters, sculptors, poets and playwrights have been inspired by her story.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 548 other followers