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Archive for the ‘Humanities & Social Sciences’ Category

The Codex Mendoza, early 1540s

The ‘Codex Mendoza’, pt. I.; fol. 002r, early 1540s. Image and original data provided by the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. Copyright Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

As we built our AP® Art History Teaching Resources over the last three years, we found ourselves fascinated by some of the newly required content. Over the next year, we will offer periodic webinars on some of these works of art and architecture; the first one will be on the Colonial Americas.

The art of the Colonial Americas is represented in the curriculum framework by six distinct objects. One of these is the “Codex Mendoza,” named for the first viceroy of Mexico (1535-1550), who commissioned it c. 1542 (contributed to the Artstor Digital Library by the Bodleian Library). Intended as a gift to Charles V, the manuscript never reached the monarch.

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Tim Dirven; Two boys ride a bike at the ruins of Palmyra; 2008; Palmyra, Syria. © Tim Dirven / Panos Pictures

Tim Dirven; Two boys ride a bike at the ruins of Palmyra; 2008; Palmyra, Syria. © Tim Dirven / Panos Pictures

Panos Pictures and Artstor have collaborated to share more than 1,000 additional photographs of contemporary global affairs in the Digital Library, bringing the total to more than 32,000 images in Artstor.

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Bruce Eric Kaplan, "Where does he get all his ideas?" Condé Nast; cartoonbank.licensestream.com. New Yorker Cartoons: Kaplan, Bruce Eric/The New Yorker Collection; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

Bruce Eric Kaplan, “Where does he get all his ideas?” Condé Nast; cartoonbank.licensestream.com. New Yorker Cartoons: Kaplan, Bruce Eric/The New Yorker Collection; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

Artstor has released approximately 18,000 additional images from Condé Nast in the Digital Library, including nearly 3,000 cartoons from The New Yorker and 15,000 fashion photographs from the Fairchild Photo Service.

Vivienne Westwood Red Label Fall 2013 Ready to Wear. Photographer: Giovanni Giannoni. Condé Nast; condenaststore.com | Fairchild Photo Service; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

Vivienne Westwood Red Label Fall 2013 Ready to Wear. Photographer: Giovanni Giannoni. Condé Nast; condenaststore.com | Fairchild Photo Service; Contact information: Content Licensing, 4 Times Square, NY, NY 10036; Tel No: 212-286-7147; licensing@condenast.com

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Samuel H. Gottscho, Washington Square, c. 1930

Samuel H. Gottscho, Washington Square, c. 1930. Museum of the City of New York

The Artstor Digital Library and the Museum of the City of New York have collaborated to release approximately 6,000 additional photos.

This release consists of photographs of the city by Samuel H. Gottscho, who founded his architectural photography firm in 1925. The collection includes pictures made for his commercial clients as well as non-commissioned work depicting iconic portraits of New York’s changing skyline, bridges, and skyscrapers in the years between the world wars.

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Palmyra; theatre exterior from south. Date of photograph: 1977. Image and original data provided by Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom.

Palmyra; theatre exterior from south. Date of photograph: 1977. Image and original data provided by Sheila S. Blair and Jonathan M. Bloom.

Photographs released by the militant group Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, have confirmed the destruction of the ancient Temple of Baalshamin in Palmyra, Syria. Until now, the ancient city of Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage site, contained remarkably well-preserved structures built by the Romans nearly 2,000 years ago, making it one of the most important archaeological sites in the region. The news of the Temple’s destruction was preceded by the horrifying news that Khaled Asaad, the 83-year-old chief of the city’s antiquities department, was publicly beheaded. While the seemingly endless loss of lives must be our primary concern, the destruction of the Temple of Baalshamin is shocking for its attempt to erase Syria and the region’s rich, multicultural history. The New York Times quoted Irina Bokova, the director general of UNESCO, saying “The art and architecture of Palmyra, standing at the crossroads of several civilizations, is a symbol of the complexity and wealth of the Syrian identity and history. Extremists seek to destroy this diversity and richness, and I call on the international community to stand united against this persistent cultural cleansing.”

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Colonial WilliamsburgArtstor and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation are collaborating to make available approximately 1,000 images of works from the Foundation’s collections in the Digital Library.

The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation operates the world’s largest living history museum in Williamsburg, Virginia—the restored 18th-century capital of Britain’s largest, wealthiest, and most populous outpost of empire in the New World. Here it interprets the origins of the idea of America in the years before and during the American Revolution. The story of Colonial Williamsburg’s Revolutionary City tells how diverse peoples, having different and sometimes conflicting ambitions, evolved into a society that valued liberty and equality.

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Unknown (Dominican), Saint Nicholas of Bari's Hospital, Santo Domingo, Photographer: Anthony Stevens Acevedo, Image: 2009. Photograph copyright © CUNY Dominican Studies Institute. CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, First Blacks in the Americas collection.

Unknown (Dominican), Saint Nicholas of Bari’s Hospital, Santo Domingo, Photographer: Anthony Stevens Acevedo, Image: 2009. Photograph copyright © CUNY Dominican Studies Institute. CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, First Blacks in the Americas collection.

La Española, the island now divided into the Dominican Republic and the Republic of Haiti, existed first as a Spanish colony during the entire sixteenth century, when its population became the first one in the Americas with a majority of people of African descent. The Black ancestors of today’s Dominicans were the first to experience the dreadful transatlantic slave trade, and the first to offer organized resistance as soon as they landed in La Española. They were also the first to endure and survive all the varieties of enslaved labor and enslaved life, and the first to thrive and produce new generations of Afro-descendants born in the “New World.”

Sixteenth-Century La Española: Glimpses of the First Blacks in the Early Colonial Americas,” an exhibition opening this week at the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, presents images of manuscripts, transcriptions, translations, and photographs that tell the story of the earliest Black inhabitants of the Americas. The exhibit includes photographs of sites of the Dominican Republic’s colonial past by Anthony Stevens-Acevedo, Assistant Director of the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute at The City College of New York, the co-curator of the exhibit and a colonial historian. Dr. Lissette Acosta Corniel, CUNY DSI Post-Doctoral Fellow, is also a co-curator of the exhibit.

The show is an offshoot of “First Blacks in the Americas,” a long term CUNY DSI online project focusing on photographs that were part of the living environment of Black people in that territory during colonial times. Part of the collection is available in Shared Shelf Commons, an open-access library of digital media from Shared Shelf subscribers.

“Sixteenth-Century La Española: Glimpses of the First Blacks in the Early Colonial Americas” opens May 22 6:30–8:00 PM, and is on view through September 10, 2015 at the CUNY Dominican Studies Institute, NAC Building Room 2/202, The City College of New York, 160 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10031.

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