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Archive for the ‘Latin American Art’ Category

The Codex Mendoza, early 1540s

The ‘Codex Mendoza’, pt. I.; fol. 002r, early 1540s. Image and original data provided by the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. Copyright Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.

As we built our AP® Art History Teaching Resources over the last three years, we found ourselves fascinated by some of the newly required content. Over the next year, we will offer periodic webinars on some of these works of art and architecture; the first one will be on the Colonial Americas.

The art of the Colonial Americas is represented in the curriculum framework by six distinct objects. One of these is the “Codex Mendoza,” named for the first viceroy of Mexico (1535-1550), who commissioned it c. 1542 (contributed to the Artstor Digital Library by the Bodleian Library). Intended as a gift to Charles V, the manuscript never reached the monarch.

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Frida Kahlo is world-famous for her self-portraits, which were a big part of her relatively small oeuvre (55 out of 144 paintings), while her husband Diego Rivera, despite producing much more work than Kahlo, only painted himself approximately 20 times. Why is that?

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Diego Rivera, Cruzando La Barranca/Crossing the Barranca, 1929-1930; Photo: Bob Schalkwijk © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), INBA

Diego Rivera, Cruzando La Barranca/Crossing the Barranca, 1929-1930; Photo: Bob Schalkwijk © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), INBA

Artstor and Bob Schalkwijk have just released an additional 850 images selected from the photographer’s archives of Mexican art in the Digital Library.

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unknown (Moche), Vessel (left view), 100-800 C.E., Peru, north coast. Fowler Museum (University of California, Los Angeles)

Unknown (Moche), Vessel (left view), 100-800 C.E., Peru, north coast. Fowler Museum (University of California, Los Angeles)

Artstor and the Fowler Museum at UCLA are now making nearly 3,200 images of Andean ceramics collection available in the Digital Library.

The Fowler Museum’s collections include more than 120,000 art and ethnographic objects and approximately 600,000 archaeological objects from ancient, traditional, and contemporary cultures around the world.

The Fowler Museum at UCLA was established in 1963 to consolidate the collections of non-Western art and artifacts dispersed throughout the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles. As one of the top university museums in the United States, the Fowler initiates research projects, fieldwork, publications, exhibitions, and public programming to enhance the understanding and appreciation of global arts cultures.

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Claude Monet, Water Lilies,  1919. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Claude Monet, Water Lilies, 1919. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

After the coldest recorded February in New York City since 1934, spring has finally sprung, and we could not be more relieved.

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Diego Rivera, Cruzando La Barranca/Crossing the Barranca, 1929-1930; Photo: Bob Schalkwijk © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), INBA

Diego Rivera, Cruzando La Barranca/Crossing the Barranca, 1929-1930; Photo: Bob Schalkwijk © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), INBA

Artstor and Bob Schalkwijk have just released more than 2,100 images selected from the photographer’s archives of pre-Columbian, colonial, and 19th- and 20th-century art from Mexico in the Digital Library. The collection in Artstor focuses on murals by renowned artists such as Diego Rivera, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and José Clemente Orozco, as well as more than 50 artworks by Frida Kahlo. This is the first release of an anticipated total of 3,000 images.

An accomplished anthropological photographer, Bob Schalkwijk began his career in 1960 in Mexico. In addition to his photography of Mexican art, Schalkwijk’s work documents indigenous traditions, culinary customs, sculptures, arts and crafts, and local dress. He has traveled throughout four continents and most of Mexico focusing on people, their environment, and their culture. His archives of more than 400,000 photographs range from portraits to landscapes throughout the world.

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artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and The University of Texas at Austin are collaborating to release more than 900 images in the Digital Library documenting two significant renovation projects of Mexican architectural landmarks: the restoration of Teposcolula’s Open Chapel’s vault, and the restoration of the Templo y Exconvento de Santo Domingo de Guzmán in Oaxaca.

The Teposcolula Open Chapel is considered one of the best examples of an ‘open chapel’ – a characteristic structure of Mexican Christian architecture. The nearby Santo Domingo church, founded by Dominican friars in the 1570s, is an impressive baroque church and adjoining convent. The expansive site, built up over 200 years, features a series of cloisters and courtyards, and a large sanctuary. Retablo paintings by Spanish master Andrés de la Concha are still visible inside the church. (more…)

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