Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Modern & Contemporary Art’ Category

Photographer D. James Dee and his archive

Photographer D. James Dee and his archive

The Roy Lichtenstein Foundation has awarded $75,000 to Artstor in support of the James Dee Archives project. The Archives are composed of approximately 250,000 slides, transparencies, negatives, and photographs documenting contemporary art in New York City over the last four decades, and Artstor is digitizing and maintaining the archive for use in research and education. The gift will support the processing of the collection, developing crowdsourcing software for collaborative cataloging, and the outreach to galleries and individuals who would be helpful in interpreting the images.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Sandra Rowe, Snake, 1991. Bucknell University: Artists' Books Collection

Sandra Rowe, Snake, 1991. Bucknell University: Artists’ Books Collection

Whether you consider illuminated manuscripts from the Middle Ages the beginning, or you start with William Blake’s self-published books of poetry in the 18th century, artists have been making books for centuries. But as Toni Sant recounts in his book Franklin Furnace and the Spirit of the Avant-garde, the term “artists’ books” is fairly recent. It only appeared in 1973 as the title of an exhibition at Moore College, and it wasn’t until 1980 that the Library of Congress adopted the term in its list of established subjects.

This delay might stem from the infinite variety of forms that artists’ books take, sometimes pushing our understanding of what a book is to unexpected extremes.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Garth Greenan Gallery are collaborating to release 20 images of works by the artist Howardena Pindell in the Digital Library.

Howardena Pindell (b.1943) explores issues of racism, feminism, violence, slavery, and exploitation through the language of abstraction. She is known for her use of unconventional materials in her otherwise formalist paintings, including string, perfume, glitter, and postcards. Pindell also occasionally works in video.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor is collaborating with artist Joseph Peller to release 40 images of his paintings in the Digital Library.

Joseph Peller (b.1953) explores the haunting notions of isolation and ambivalence inherent in the unnoticed rituals of modern urban life. He experiments with a wide range of pure and mixed techniques in painting, printmaking and sculpture.

Peller has exhibited in solo exhibitions in New York and Toronto, and has participated in group exhibitions in the United States, Canada, Europe, and China. He has received recognition in national exhibitions and mention in several publications including ArtNews, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. In 2013, the artist was awarded a printmaking residency as a guest of the People’s Republic of China. He taught at the New York Academy of Art and currently teaches at the Art Students League of New York. Joseph Peller’s work — represented by ACA Galleries, New York and Roberts Gallery, Toronto — can be found in public and private collections in the United States, Canada, Europe, and China. (more…)

Read Full Post »

artstor_logo_rgbThe Artstor Digital Library and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee are collaborating to share 7,000 images of works from the UWM Art Collection.

The UWM Art Collection encompasses 7,600 objects – western and non-western art, ancient to contemporary. Areas of special strength include prints from the 15th to 20th century, Greek and Russian Icons, American folk art, and ethnographic collections of Africa and Oceania. The Blanche and Henry Rosenberg Collection of Modern Art is an impressive grouping of two- and three-dimensional works representing the major stylistic trends of the first half of the twentieth century. Notable artists featured in this collection of over 300 objects includes Jean Arp, Joan Miró, Henry Moore, Victor Vasarely, Alexander Calder, and Pablo Picasso. The Rogers Family Collection of Greek and Russian Icons represents a remarkable array of icons, many dating to the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The collection also consists of numerous liturgical objects, finely executed in gold, bronze, wood, and enamel, including reliquary and processional crosses, chalices, spoons, as well as secular pieces such as Byzantine coins and jewelry. The Emile H. Mathis II Print Collection is an expansive assemblage of 1,500 works on paper spanning 500 years of art history. The collection, which represents Mathis’ lifetime passion for fine art, includes excellent examples of 17th century etchings by Jacques Callot and Rembrandt van Rijn; 19th century French, British, and American printmakers including Francis Seymour Haden, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec; early 20th century prints by Kathe Kollwitz, Pablo Picasso, and Joan Miró; and extensive holdings of late 20th century American artists: Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Jim Dine, Claes Oldenburg, and Robert Rauschenberg. The African art collection provides an encyclopedic overview of 19th and early 20th century African art, with objects from nearly one hundred different cultural areas and twenty-three different countries.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Joseph Beuys, Green Violin and Telephone S--------R (Sender--------Receiver), 1974

Joseph Beuys, Green Violin and Telephone S——–R (Sender——–Receiver), 1974. Image and original data provided by Yale University. ©2008 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

Survey of Western Art 2: Renaissance to Postmodern
Nancy Minty, Ph.D, Collections Editor, Artstor
This curriculum guide consists of a thorough overview of later western art (approximately 1300 through 2000 CE, completing the Survey of Western Art 1: Prehistoric to Gothic), presenting the cultural heritage of Europe and the New World with an emphasis on seminal works, including architecture, paintings and sculptures, manuscripts, prints, drawings and decorative arts, in addition to photography and installations. Students will hone visual and descriptive skills as they enhance their recognition of schools and styles, and, conversely, their awareness of breaks within the western tradition. Readings will be selected from survey texts as well as scholarly articles.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

It wasn’t a particularly auspicious start. On February 6, 1799, an announcement appeared on the front page of the Diario de Madrid advertising Los Caprichos:

A series of prints of whimsical subjects, invented and etched by Don Francisco Goya. The artist, persuaded that the censure of human errors and vices—though it seems to belong properly to oratory and poetry—may also be the object of painting, has chosen as appropriate subjects for his work, among the multitude of extravagances and follies which are common throughout civilized society, and among vulgar prejudices and frauds rooted in custom, ignorance, or interest, those which he has believed to be most apt to provide an occasion for ridicule and at the same time to exercise his imagination.[1]

The advertisement goes on to assure potential collectors that the subjects of the prints are imaginary and that “in none of the compositions constituting this series has the artist proposed to ridicule the particular defects of this or that individual…”

It closes with the address where the prints can be bought—the ironically named No. 1 Calle del Desengaño, or Street of Disillusion #1—and the price: 320 reales for the set, the equivalent of one ounce of gold. The unusual venue, a perfume and liquor store near Goya’s apartment, was the result of the artist not being able to find a regular bookshop to handle the sale, according to Goya biographer Robert Hughes.

The venture was a resounding failure. Only 27 sets of the edition of 300 sold, and Goya withdrew Los Caprichos from public sale shortly after their release, afraid of falling foul of the Inquisition. It was a substantial monetary loss for the artist.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 547 other followers