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Archive for the ‘Modern & Contemporary Art’ Category

AlbrightKnoxArtstor and the Albright-Knox Art Gallery are collaborating to make 2,000 images of artworks from the museum’s Fine Art Collection available in the Digital Library.

Founded officially in December 1862, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery is among the country’s oldest public arts institutions in the United States. Since its inception as The Buffalo Fine Arts Academy, the museum has been dedicated to acquiring, exhibiting, and preserving modern and contemporary art, giving rise to one of the world’s most extraordinary art collections.

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Jacki Apple & Martine Aballea, Artists Reading, 1977

Jacki Apple & Martine Aballea, Artists Reading, 1977. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris, Moving image and original data provided by Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc.; franklinfurnace.org

We are delighted to announce that Artstor has released nearly 50 videos of performance art from the Franklin Furnace Archive in the Digital Library. The videos feature such avant-garde artists as Alice Aycock, Ericka Beckman, Lee Breuer, John Cage, Guy De Cointet, Constance De Jong, Richard Foreman, the Kipper Kids, Jill Kroesen, Matt Mullican, Michael Smith, and William Wegman.

Les Levine, Artists Reading, 1976. © 2012 Les Levine / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Moving image and original data provided by Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc.; franklinfurnace.org

Les Levine, Artists Reading, 1976. © 2012 Les Levine / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Moving image and original data provided by Franklin Furnace Archive, Inc.; franklinfurnace.org

As Franklin Furnace’s founding director Martha Wilson said, “While there is undeniable value to gathering objects from performances such as costumes, props, and ephemera, video offers an irreplaceable key to understanding temporal works. Moving images are the best window we have into the past—no amount of caption text or notes from scripts can convey the look and feel of this pivotal time!”

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Agnes Bernice Martin, Waters, 1962. Seattle Art Museum; seattleartmuseum.org. © 2008 Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Agnes Bernice Martin, Waters, 1962, Seattle Art Museum. © 2008 Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

To the pioneers of Minimalism, Agnes Martin’s grid paintings were an early source of inspiration. To the Abstract Expressionists, Martin was a peer, whose use of line to cover canvases from edge to edge was not a gesture of Minimal art, but an expression of the AbEx concept of “allover” painting. In her own words, her pale, meditative geometry harkened back to much older ideas. Her art, she claimed, should be recognized alongside that of the ancient’s— the Egyptians, Greeks, Coptics, and, most importantly, Chinese.

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Éduard Manet, The Execution of Maximilian, ca. 1867-8. Photograph: ©The National Gallery, London

Éduard Manet, The Execution of Maximilian, ca. 1867-8. Photograph: © The National Gallery, London

Édouard Manet’s Luncheon on the Grass was the scandal of the year in France when it was exhibited in the 1863 Salon des Refusés, and Olympia was greeted with the same shock and indignation in the Paris Salon of 1865 (a journalist wrote, “If the canvas of the Olympia was not destroyed, it is only because of the precautions that were taken by the administration”). So selling tickets to show a new painting in America that was too controversial for France seemed a surefire way to get attention—and perhaps make a little money.

From 1867 to 1869, Édouard Manet had made some works depicting the execution of Emperor Maximilian in Mexico in 1867. But considering that Maximilian’s empire had collapsed after Napoleon III withdrew his support, it was not prudent to exhibit them in France while Napoleon remained in power.

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Work: Robert Longo, Portrait of Jeffrey, 1980, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York;  Image: D. James Dee.

Work: Robert Longo, Portrait of Jeffrey, 1980, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Image: D. James Dee.

Artstor has released more than 550 images from the D. James Dee Archive of contemporary art in the Digital Library. The collection includes images of work by Claes Oldenburg, Robert Gober, Hannah Wilke, Tauba Auerbach, Glenn Ligon, Rudolf Stingel, Sherrie Levine, Andy Warhol, and many others. These photographs were taken for the artists or for the gallery where they were exhibited: Deitch Projects, Paula Cooper Gallery, Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, and DC Moore. Specifically, there are wonderful works on paper by Donald Judd and Brice Marden exhibited at Susan Sheehan Gallery, drawings by Oldenburg and Gober, fashion sketches by Stephen Sprouse shown at Deitch Projects, painted photographs by Duane Michals shown at DC Moore, and paintings by Dan Walsh.

These images, a sampling of digital photographs taken between 2008 and 2013, are the first batch in what will eventually be a collection of more than 100,000 photographs taken by Dee of leading artists’ work from the 1970s until his retirement in 2013. During this time he worked as the “SoHo Photographer,” documenting works for artists and blue chip galleries at a time when the SoHo neighborhood was the center of the New York art world. (more…)

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Thomas McGovern, Untitled, 1992. © Thomas McGovern

Thomas McGovern, Untitled, 1992. © Thomas McGovern

Artstor and Thomas McGovern are now sharing more than 100 photographs from the artist’s series covering the AIDS crisis in the Digital Library.

The photographs, taken between 1987 and 1997, portray individuals with AIDS and activist demonstrations in the U.S. “While I have photographed many aspects of the crisis since 1987, it is the portraits of people with AIDS that are central to the project and it is around these that the other photos of events revolve,” McGovern writes.

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Wangechi Mutu, Yo Mama, 2003. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Wangechi Mutu, Yo Mama, 2003. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Artstor and Wangechi Mutu are now sharing all the images included in the artist’s two major museum surveys: Wangechi Mutu at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney, and A Fantastic Journey, a travelling show that opened at the Nasher Museum of Art.

Kenya-born artist Wangechi Mutu scrutinizes globalization by combining found materials, magazine cutouts, sculpture, and painted imagery. Mutu is best known for provocative collages that combine drawn elements and image fragments from a variety of media such as fashion magazines, ethnographic journals, and pornography to explore gender, race, war, colonialism, global consumption, and the exoticization of the black female body.

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