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Archive for the ‘Native American Art & Culture’ Category

MOA logo_colour variationsUBCLib_short_blkArtstor and the University of British Columbia are collaborating to make available more than 65,000 images of art and other cultural objects from the UBC Museum of Anthropology’s permanent collection, and 250 Japanese maps from the UBC Library’s Tokugawa collection.

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Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Easter is around the corner, and with it comes the inevitable barrage of images of the Easter bunny. The strange thing is that the only mentions of rabbits in the Bible are prohibitions against eating them in the Old Testament. So what gives?

The underlying idea is that rabbits are connected to the idea of rebirth—not only do they reproduce prodigiously, at one time they were believed to reproduce asexually. The connection of rabbits to rebirth also occurs in non-Christian societies: The Rabbit in the Moon (instead of our Man in the Moon) is a familiar symbol in Asia, and was part of Aztec legend, tying the idea of rabbits to a “rebirth” every night. But other qualities of rabbits and hares also get highlighted in folklore, including their mischievous side, playing the role of cunning tricksters in Native American and Central African mythologies. (more…)

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Visitors viewing display cases and Bird Dome, Hall of the Birds of the World, 1927, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: H. S. Rice. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Visitors viewing display cases and Bird Dome, Hall of the Birds of the World, 1927, American Museum of Natural History, Photographer: H. S. Rice. Image and original data provided by Library, American Museum of Natural History

Visiting the Museum of Natural History was high on my list of priorities on my first trip to New York City. This was in big part due to its mention in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye—even if, to be honest, I didn’t quite remember the role it played in the book.

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pmxArtstor and the Portland Art Museum are collaborating to share approximately 2,500 images of artworks, with a particular focus on the Museum’s premier collections of Native American and Northwest art.

Remarkable for its depth and diversity, the Museum’s permanent collection of Native American art consists of over 3,000 objects that date from pre-European contact to the present. The collection features important works created by some 200 North American cultural groups and contemporary artists, with especially strong representation of artworks from the Northwest coastal region. Anchored by the world-renowned Rasmussen Collection of Northwest Coast Art and the encyclopedic Elizabeth Cole Butler Collection, the Portland Art Museum’s collection of Native American art is the single most visited and researched aspect of the Museum’s collection.

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Pueblo | Pottery water bottle | Santa Fe, New Mexico | Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (Harvard University); peabody.harvard.edu

Pueblo | Pottery water bottle | Santa Fe, New Mexico | Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology (Harvard University); peabody.harvard.edu

Artstor Digital Library has collaborated with the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University to share 24,000 additional images of Pre-Columbian, African, Native North American, Oceanic, Asian, and European objects. This brings the current available total to more than 52,000 of a projected 154,000 images from the Museum’s collection.

The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University is the oldest museum devoted to anthropology in the United States and holds a permanent collection of millions of objects documenting the history of human culture throughout the Americas, Africa, Oceania, Asia, and Europe. The museum’s archaeological holdings comprise the majority of the permanent collection, with particular strengths in North, Central, and South America. Though smaller in number, the ethnographic collections have established the museum’s reputation as a preeminent repository of anthropological objects relating to Native American, Pre-Columbian, African, Oceanic, and Asian cultural groups. There are also extensive archival collections, which document the museum’s collections and history, as well as the development anthropology as an academic discipline. Selections from the museum’s permanent collection of archaeological objects, ethnographic artifacts, and archival materials will be added to the Artstor Digital Library for scholarly and educational uses. (more…)

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artstor_logo_rgb2ARTstor has reached an agreement with the Seattle Art Museum to make available an additional 1,000 images of world art from the museum’s permanent collection.

The new images will join the more than 2,700 images of highlights from the permanent collection currently available in the ARTstor Digital Library. The museum is renowned for its collection of Asian art, including works from Japan, China, Korea, India, the Himalayas, and Southeast Asia. Also notable are its holdings in African, American, European, modern and contemporary, Native and Meso-American, and Oceanic and Aboriginal art.

For more detailed information about this collection, visit ARTstor’s Seattle Art Museum collection page.

Related collections:

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Navajo | Pin, round silver base set with 52 turquoise stones in 3 rows around a center stone | Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

ARTstor Digital Library has collaborated with the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University to share nearly 25,000 additional images of Pre-Columbian, African, Native North American, and Oceanic objects. This brings the current available total to more than 28,000 of a projected 154,000 images from the Museum’s collection. (more…)

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