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Archive for the ‘Paintings’ Category

Frida Kahlo is world-famous for her self-portraits, which were a big part of her relatively small oeuvre (55 out of 144 paintings), while her husband Diego Rivera, despite producing much more work than Kahlo, only painted himself approximately 20 times. Why is that?

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Willem van Haecht, Apelles Painting Campaspe, c.1630

Willem van Haecht, Apelles Painting Campaspe, c.1630. Image and original data provided by the Mauritshuis, The Hague

Artstor and Mauritshuis are now sharing more than 500 images from the museum’s permanent collection in the Digital Library. This is the first installment of a projected total of 1,200 images.

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Tlingit artist, leggings, ca. 1880. Image and original data from Portland Art Museum.

Tlingit artist, leggings, ca. 1880. Image and original data from Portland Art Museum.

Artstor and the Portland Art Museum are now sharing more than 2,300 images of artworks, with a particular focus on Native American and Northwest art.

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Francis Newton Souza, Untitled, 1963. © Estate of F.N. Souza © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS

Francis Newton Souza, Untitled, 1963. © Estate of F.N. Souza © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / DACS

Artstor and the Francis Newton Souza Estate have released approximately 900 images of the celebrated Indian painter’s artwork in the Artstor Digital Library.

Born in Saligoa, Goa, India in 1924, Francis Newton Souza became the first of India’s post-Independence modern painters to achieve high recognition in the West. His works can be found in major museum collections around the world, including Tate Britain and Tate Modern, the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Birmingham Museum of Art, the Wakefield Art Gallery, the Haifa Museum in Israel, the Museum of Biblical Art in Dallas, Texas, the National Gallery of Modern Art in India, the National Gallery of Victoria in Australia, and the Glenbarra Museum in Japan. According to Indian art historian Yashodhara Dalmia, “At the heart of Souza’s creativity was the belief that society’s destructive aspects shouldn’t be suppressed, they should be aired and confronted.”

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Sandro Botticelli, Primavera; Allegory of Spring, c. 1478, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by ©SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Sandro Botticelli, Primavera; Allegory of Spring, c. 1478, Galleria degli Uffizi. Image and original data provided by ©SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com; scalarchives.com

Kenyon Cox (1856-1919) might now be best remembered for his murals in the Library of Congress, as well as in the state capitol buildings of Des Moines, St. Paul, and Madison, but he was also a respected writer and influential teacher. In 1911, he delivered a series of lectures on painting at the Art Institute of Chicago, later published as The Classic Point of View. His accessible writing style and his infectious enthusiasm for the Old Masters still speak to us today. Following is an excerpt from his lecture on the importance of drawing, focusing on the work of Botticelli and Michelangelo.

Drawing is a great expressional art and deals with beauty and significance, not with mere fact. Its great masters are the greatest artists that ever lived, and high attainment in it has always been rarer than high attainment in color. Its tools are the line and so much of light and shade as is necessary to convey the sense of bulk and modelling, anything more being something added for its own beauty and expressiveness, not a part of the sources of the draftsman. Its aims are, first, to develop in the highest degree the abstract beauty and significance possessed by lines in themselves, more or less independently of representation; second, to express with the utmost clearness and force the material significance of objects and, especially, of the human body. According as one or the other of these aims predominates we have one or the other of the two great schools into which draftsmen may be divided. These schools may be typified by the greatest masters of each, the school of Botticelli, or the school of pure line; the school of Michelangelo, or the school of significant form. Between these lie all the law and the prophets. Of course no artist ever belonged entirely and exclusively to either school. It is always a matter of balance and the predominance of interest. Even a Botticelli tried to put some significant form inside his beautiful lines, and even Michelangelo gave thought to the abstract beauty of his lines apart from the significant form they bounded. (more…)

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20469_UofPS_stacked_maroonRGB200Artstor and the University of Puget Sound have released more than 120 images of works by the painter, activist, and writer Abby Williams Hill in the Digital Library.

Abby Williams Hill (b.1861) is best known for her commissions for the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railways. Her railway works were exhibited at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, the Lewis & Clark Exposition in Portland in 1905, the Jamestown Tricentennial in 1907, and the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle in 1909. These pieces, along with her other landscapes, offer a rich portrait of the natural landscape of the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The accompanying archive of papers and personal materials offer insight into Hill’s life and provides an example of the American experience between the Civil War and World War II.

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Agnes Bernice Martin, Waters, 1962. Seattle Art Museum; seattleartmuseum.org. © 2008 Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Agnes Bernice Martin, Waters, 1962, Seattle Art Museum. © 2008 Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

To the pioneers of Minimalism, Agnes Martin’s grid paintings were an early source of inspiration. To the Abstract Expressionists, Martin was a peer, whose use of line to cover canvases from edge to edge was not a gesture of Minimal art, but an expression of the AbEx concept of “allover” painting. In her own words, her pale, meditative geometry harkened back to much older ideas. Her art, she claimed, should be recognized alongside that of the ancient’s— the Egyptians, Greeks, Coptics, and, most importantly, Chinese.

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