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Archive for the ‘Paintings’ Category

artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the University of Puget Sound are collaborating to release 150 images of works by the painter, activist, and writer Abby Williams Hill in the Digital Library.

Abby Williams Hill (b.1861) is best known for her commissions for the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railways. Her railway works were exhibited at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, the Lewis & Clark Exposition in Portland in 1905, the Jamestown Tricentennial in 1907, and the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle in 1909. These pieces, along with her other landscapes, offer a rich portrait of the natural landscape of the American West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The accompanying archive of papers and personal materials offer insight into Hill’s life and provides an example of the American experience between the Civil War and World War II.

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artstor_logo_rgb2Artstor and the Garth Greenan Gallery are collaborating to release 20 images of works by the artist Howardena Pindell in the Digital Library.

Howardena Pindell (b.1943) explores issues of racism, feminism, violence, slavery, and exploitation through the language of abstraction. She is known for her use of unconventional materials in her otherwise formalist paintings, including string, perfume, glitter, and postcards. Pindell also occasionally works in video.

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John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778. Image: Courtesy of National Gallery of Art, Washington

John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778. Image: Courtesy of National Gallery of Art, Washington

Artstor and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC have released more than 24,000 images from the museum’s collection in the Digital Library.

This release includes vast numbers of works of art by some of the most important artists from the 13th to 19th centuries. A partial list includes 36 works by Hans Baldung Grien, 10 works by Giovanni Bellini, 176 works by William Blake, five works by Pierre Bonnard, six works by Botticelli, 39 works by François Boucher, four works by Bronzino, 13 works by Julia Margaret Cameron, 96 works by Mary Cassatt, 292 works by Paul Cezanne, nine works by John Constable, 17 works by John Singleton Copley, 91 works by Corot, four works by Correggio, nine works by Gustave Courbet, 85 works by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 998 works by Honoré Daumier, 25 works by Jacques-Louis David, 106 works by Edgar Degas, 58 works by Eugène Delacroix, 354 works by Albrecht Dürer, 54 works by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, 15 works by Thomas Gainsborough, 159 works by Paul Gauguin, 39 works by Théodore Gericault, 20 works by Vincent Van Gogh, 38 works by Francisco de Goya, seven works by El Greco, eight works by Frans Hals, 88 works by William Hogarth, 61 works by Hans Holbein the Younger, 55 works by Winslow Homer, 25 works by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, four works by Leonardo Da Vinci, four works by Fra Filippo Lippi, 58 works by Edouard Manet, 12 works by Jean-François Millet, 21 works by Claude Monet, 25 works by Berthe Morisot, 37 works by Edvard Munch, 23 works by Eadweard Muybridge, 19 works by Parmigianino, 108 works by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, 59 works by Camille Pissarro, 12 works by Raphael, 90 works by Odilon Redon, 366 works by Rembrandt van Rijn, 55 works by Auguste Renoir, 35 works by Auguste Rodin, 21 Peter Paul Rubens, seven works by John Singer Sargent, five works by Georges Seurat, 52 works by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, twelve works by Jacopo Tintoretto, 12 works by Titian, 294 works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 115 works by William Turner, eight works by Félix Vallotton, nine works by Veronese, 62 works by Edouard Vuillard, 17 works by Antoine Watteau, and 545 works by James McNeill Whistler.

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Jacques-Louis David, Apollo and Diana Attacking the Children of Niobe, 1772. Image © Dallas Museum of Art, Image and data from: Dallas Museum of Art

Jacques-Louis David, Apollo and Diana Attacking the Children of Niobe, 1772. Image © Dallas Museum of Art, Image and data from: Dallas Museum of Art

The Dallas Museum of Art has collaborated with Artstor to make 600 additional images from its permanent collection available in the Images for Academic Publishing (IAP) program.

The release includes works by artists as varied as Jean Paul Gaultier, Louis Comfort Tiffany, and Everett Spruce. This brings the museum’s current total of images in IAP to 730.

For more detailed information about this collection, visit the Dallas Museum of Art Collection page in Artstor.

The IAP program aims to offload the costs of museums delivering high-resolution image files to scholars for academic publications by providing high-quality TIFF image files free to both Artstor subscribers and non-subscribers alike. For more information, visit artstor.org/iap.

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logo-arasArtstor is collaborating with the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism to release 17,000 images documenting mythology, symbols and rituals from different time periods and geographic locations in the Digital Library.

The images in Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS) explore the universality of certain iconographies and themes, illustrating commonalities in the ways human beings across the world have thought about and represented different phenomena. Each image includes commentary that points to its unique history and contextualizes it within larger patterns and historical developments. The collection supports interdisciplinary humanities research, research on the meaning of images in psychoanalysis and dreams, and provides support for designers searching for pictorial inspiration. (more…)

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Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa, 1503-1506, Musée du Louvre. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

In 2012, 150,000 people signed a petition asking the Louvre to return Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa to its “home city” of Florence, Italy. Not surprisingly, the Louvre declined. The Mona Lisa has done its share of traveling in the past 500 years, and more often than not it has proven nerve racking.

Before we get to the travel stories, let’s look at Florence’s claim. Leonardo da Vinci did start painting the Mona Lisa in 1503 or 1504 in the Italian city, but in 1516 he was invited by King François I to work in France, and scholars believe he finished the painting there, and there it has remained. After Leonardo’s death, the king bought the Mona Lisa and exhibited it at the Palace of Fontainebleau, its home for more than 100 years, until Louis XIV took it to the Palace of Versailles. (more…)

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Joseph Beuys, Green Violin and Telephone S--------R (Sender--------Receiver), 1974

Joseph Beuys, Green Violin and Telephone S——–R (Sender——–Receiver), 1974. Image and original data provided by Yale University. ©2008 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

Survey of Western Art 2: Renaissance to Postmodern
Nancy Minty, Ph.D, Collections Editor, Artstor
This curriculum guide consists of a thorough overview of later western art (approximately 1300 through 2000 CE, completing the Survey of Western Art 1: Prehistoric to Gothic), presenting the cultural heritage of Europe and the New World with an emphasis on seminal works, including architecture, paintings and sculptures, manuscripts, prints, drawings and decorative arts, in addition to photography and installations. Students will hone visual and descriptive skills as they enhance their recognition of schools and styles, and, conversely, their awareness of breaks within the western tradition. Readings will be selected from survey texts as well as scholarly articles.

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