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Archive for the ‘Paintings’ Category

Agnes Bernice Martin, Waters, 1962. Seattle Art Museum; seattleartmuseum.org. © 2008 Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Agnes Bernice Martin, Waters, 1962, Seattle Art Museum. © 2008 Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

To the pioneers of Minimalism, Agnes Martin’s grid paintings were an early source of inspiration. To the Abstract Expressionists, Martin was a peer, whose use of line to cover canvases from edge to edge was not a gesture of Minimal art, but an expression of the AbEx concept of “allover” painting. In her own words, her pale, meditative geometry harkened back to much older ideas. Her art, she claimed, should be recognized alongside that of the ancient’s— the Egyptians, Greeks, Coptics, and, most importantly, Chinese.

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Hofstra_University.svgArtstor and the Hofstra University Museum are collaborating to make 200 images from the Museum’s permanent collection available in the Digital Library.

Integral to the academic mission of Hofstra University, the Hofstra University Museum advances knowledge and understanding through experiences with authentic works of art from the world’s diverse cultures. The Museum’s mission is achieved through collection acquisition and preservation, exhibitions and interpretive resources.

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Tufts_university_logoArtstor is collaborating with the Tufts University Art Gallery to release 2,000 images from the University’s permanent art collection in the Digital Library.

The Tufts University permanent art collection is comprised of approximately 2,000 works spanning ancient Mediterranean and pre-Hispanic cultures, modern and contemporary painting and sculpture, and photography. Much of the collection is comprised of works on paper, as well as twentieth- and twentieth-first century photography.

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PacitaArtstor and the Pacita Abad Art Estate are collaborating to make available 500 images of the artist’s works in the Digital Library.

The internationally renowned Philippine-American artist Pacita Abad (1946 – 2004) was born in Batanes, a small island in the South China Sea. Her 32-year painting career began when she had to leave the Philippines due to her student political activism against the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, and she traveled to the United States to study law. However, after a few years she switched careers to dedicate her life to art and studied painting at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C. and The Art Students League in New York City. Since that time Abad never stopped being a nomadic artist and painted the globe while working on six continents and traveling to over 50 countries. During her career she created over 4,500 artworks, and her paintings were exhibited in more than 200 museums and galleries around the world.

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William Turner of Oxford, Shepherd Boy on a Hillside, ca. 1840. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

William Turner of Oxford, Shepherd Boy on a Hillside, ca. 1840. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection

He was only eighteen years old, yet William Turner’s watercolors were already praised in print as follows: “By dint of his superior art he has rolled such clouds over these landscapes as has given to a flat country an equal grandeur with mountain scenery, while they fully account for the striking and natural effects of light and shade which he has introduced.” The critic John Ruskin would also become a big supporter in the artist’s later years.

How could they not admire those rolling landscapes, the colorful skies! No wonder Turner’s considered a precursor to the Impressionists! Oh wait—wrong William Turner.

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Éduard Manet, The Execution of Maximilian, ca. 1867-8. Photograph: ©The National Gallery, London

Éduard Manet, The Execution of Maximilian, ca. 1867-8. Photograph: © The National Gallery, London

Édouard Manet’s Luncheon on the Grass was the scandal of the year in France when it was exhibited in the 1863 Salon des Refusés, and Olympia was greeted with the same shock and indignation in the Paris Salon of 1865 (a journalist wrote, “If the canvas of the Olympia was not destroyed, it is only because of the precautions that were taken by the administration”). So selling tickets to show a new painting in America that was too controversial for France seemed a surefire way to get attention—and perhaps make a little money.

From 1867 to 1869, Édouard Manet had made some works depicting the execution of Emperor Maximilian in Mexico in 1867. But considering that Maximilian’s empire had collapsed after Napoleon III withdrew his support, it was not prudent to exhibit them in France while Napoleon remained in power.

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Joseph Peller, Night Owls. © Joseph Peller

Joseph Peller, Night Owls. © Joseph Peller

Artstor and Joseph Peller have released more than 30 images of his artworks in the Digital Library.

Joseph Peller (b.1953) explores the haunting notions of isolation and ambivalence inherent in the unnoticed rituals of modern urban life. He experiments with a wide range of pure and mixed techniques in painting, printmaking and sculpture. (more…)

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