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Work: Robert Longo, Portrait of Jeffrey, 1980, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York;  Image: D. James Dee.

Work: Robert Longo, Portrait of Jeffrey, 1980, © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; Image: D. James Dee.

Artstor has released more than 550 images from the D. James Dee Archive of contemporary art in the Digital Library. The collection includes images of work by Claes Oldenburg, Robert Gober, Hannah Wilke, Tauba Auerbach, Glenn Ligon, Rudolf Stingel, Sherrie Levine, Andy Warhol, and many others. These photographs were taken for the artists or for the gallery where they were exhibited: Deitch Projects, Paula Cooper Gallery, Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, and DC Moore. Specifically, there are wonderful works on paper by Donald Judd and Brice Marden exhibited at Susan Sheehan Gallery, drawings by Oldenburg and Gober, fashion sketches by Stephen Sprouse shown at Deitch Projects, painted photographs by Duane Michals shown at DC Moore, and paintings by Dan Walsh.

These images, a sampling of digital photographs taken between 2008 and 2013, are the first batch in what will eventually be a collection of more than 100,000 photographs taken by Dee of leading artists’ work from the 1970s until his retirement in 2013. During this time he worked as the “SoHo Photographer,” documenting works for artists and blue chip galleries at a time when the SoHo neighborhood was the center of the New York art world. (more…)

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Thomas McGovern, Untitled, 1992. © Thomas McGovern

Thomas McGovern, Untitled, 1992. © Thomas McGovern

Artstor and Thomas McGovern are now sharing more than 100 photographs from the artist’s series covering the AIDS crisis in the Digital Library.

The photographs, taken between 1987 and 1997, portray individuals with AIDS and activist demonstrations in the U.S. “While I have photographed many aspects of the crisis since 1987, it is the portraits of people with AIDS that are central to the project and it is around these that the other photos of events revolve,” McGovern writes.

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Artstor has recently released more than 1,100 photographs of Central Park from the Foundation for Landscape Studies in the Digital Library. We celebrated the occasion by speaking with Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who founded the organization in 2005 and serves as its president.

Ms. Rogers is a pivotal figure in the history of Central Park. She was appointed the Park’s administrator in 1979, charged with overseeing all aspects of daily operations. She was instrumental in founding the Central Park Conservancy in 1980, and she guided the Park’s extraordinary restoration. Rogers led the Conservancy as president until 1996, and she is now a life trustee. Her influence extends far beyond New York City, and she is frequently consulted by groups in other cities and countries desiring to form park conservancies modeled on the one for Central Park.

After stepping down from the presidency of the Central Park Conservancy, Rogers founded the Cityscape Institute. She subsequently created the Garden History and Landscape Studies curriculum at the Bard Graduate Center in 2002. She is the author of several books, including The Forests and Wetlands of New York City (1971), Rebuilding Central Park: A Management and Restoration Plan (1987), Landscape Design: A Cultural and Architectural History (2001), Writing the Garden: A Literary Conversation Across Two Centuries (2011), and Learning Las Vegas: Portrait of a Northern New Mexican Place (2013).

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Franklin C. Daiber, Peony. UD Library: Franklin C. Daiber Botanical Collection

Franklin C. Daiber, Peony. UD Library: Franklin C. Daiber Botanical Collection

The Delmarva Peninsula gets its name from the three states it’s a part of: DELaware, MARyland, and VirginiA. You could say Delmarva is technically an island, since you have to cross one of five bridges (one of them being the 20-mile long Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel) to get across the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, but since the canal is man-made it’s still considered a peninsula.

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Landscape architect: Gertrude Jekyll, and architect: Edwin Lutyens, | Le Bois des Moutiers | Image and original data provided by the Foundation for Landscape Studies | © Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Foundation for Landscape Studies

Landscape architect: Gertrude Jekyll, and architect: Edwin Lutyens, | Le Bois des Moutiers | Image and original data provided by the Foundation for Landscape Studies | © Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Foundation for Landscape Studies

The Artstor Digital Library and the Foundation for Landscape Studies are now sharing more than 1,100 additional images, the large majority of them documenting the renovation of New York City’s Central Park in the 1980s.

This brings the collection’s total in the Digital Library to 8,000 images from around the world. These images provide an overview of landscape studies, encompassing all cultural landscapes, including gardens, parks, cities, suburbs, rural areas, and the humanized wilderness. A subset of the collection consists of engravings from rare books dating from the 16th through early 20th century.

The Foundation for Landscape Studies is a nonprofit with a mission to foster an active understanding of the importance of place in human life. To this end, the foundation initiates collaborative projects with other organizations, institutions, and individuals that promote and advance landscape history and historic landscape design, theory, and practice. (more…)

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Jason Larkin | Sobhi Saleh, surrounded by Muslim Brotherhood volunteers and members, tries to organise a campaigning session in his local constituency of al-Ramal; 2010 |© Jason Larkin / Panos Pictures; www.panos.co.uk

Jason Larkin | Sobhi Saleh, surrounded by Muslim Brotherhood volunteers and members, tries to organise a campaigning session in his local constituency of al-Ramal; 2010 |© Jason Larkin / Panos Pictures; http://www.panos.co.uk

Panos Pictures and Artstor have collaborated to share an additional 1,000 images of contemporary global affairs in the Digital Library.

Panos specializes in documenting critical social issues as well as stories beyond the contemporary media landscape. Urban development in Turkey, deforestation of the Amazon rainforest, records of extinct and endangered species at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, a barbershop in Nigeria, and Charlie Chaplin impersonators in India are among the thousands of compelling places and people now discoverable via Artstor. The Panos Profile includes more than twenty photographers working in the North America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America. Dozens of additional photographers comprise the Panos network to create one of the most comprehensive visual records of international contemporary life. Images documenting urban and rural communities, landscape and the built environment, peace and conflict tell the story of the ties between globalized and regional life.

For over twenty years, Panos Pictures has been working with the commercial and nonprofit sectors, actively using photography to campaign and communicate through a range of media to new and diverse audiences. Recognizing that photography is more than pictures on a page, Panos has engaged in all forms of visual communication, producing exhibitions, multimedia, and video, as well as long-term documentary projects. Panos photographers seek out stories that matter and bring an unparalleled understanding and awareness of the sensitivities and ethical dimensions of the issues and areas they document. (more…)

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Charlotte Perriand, Travail Et Sport; Salle À Manger - Cuisine – Bar, 1929, New York School of Interior Design Library, library.nysid.edu. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Charlotte Perriand, Travail Et Sport; Salle À Manger – Cuisine – Bar, 1929, New York School of Interior Design Library, library.nysid.edu. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Artstor and the New York School of Interior Design (NYSID) are now sharing more than 450 images of pochoir prints and photographic depictions of interior retail architecture and design in Paris from 1928-1932.

The pochoir process, made by applying layers of paint guided by thin zinc or copper cut-out stencils, is characterized by its crisp edges and brilliant colors. Pochoir illustration was popular in 1920s Paris and was often featured in French fashion journals such as Le Jardin des Dames et des Modes and the Gazette du Bon Ton. Both the pochoir and photographic plates represent Art Deco design in the period following the International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts of 1925. (more…)

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