Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Sculpture & Installations’ Category

Hofstra_University.svgArtstor and the Hofstra University Museum are collaborating to make 200 images from the Museum’s permanent collection available in the Digital Library.

Integral to the academic mission of Hofstra University, the Hofstra University Museum advances knowledge and understanding through experiences with authentic works of art from the world’s diverse cultures. The Museum’s mission is achieved through collection acquisition and preservation, exhibitions and interpretive resources.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Tufts_university_logoArtstor is collaborating with the Tufts University Art Gallery to release 2,000 images from the University’s permanent art collection in the Digital Library.

The Tufts University permanent art collection is comprised of approximately 2,000 works spanning ancient Mediterranean and pre-Hispanic cultures, modern and contemporary painting and sculpture, and photography. Much of the collection is comprised of works on paper, as well as twentieth- and twentieth-first century photography.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Albrecht Dürer, Hare (A Young Hare), 1502, Graphische Sammlung Albertina. Image and original data: Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.

Easter is around the corner, and with it comes the inevitable barrage of images of the Easter bunny. The strange thing is that the only mentions of rabbits in the Bible are prohibitions against eating them in the Old Testament. So what gives?

The underlying idea is that rabbits are connected to the idea of rebirth—not only do they reproduce prodigiously, at one time they were believed to reproduce asexually. The connection of rabbits to rebirth also occurs in non-Christian societies: The Rabbit in the Moon (instead of our Man in the Moon) is a familiar symbol in Asia, and was part of Aztec legend, tying the idea of rabbits to a “rebirth” every night. But other qualities of rabbits and hares also get highlighted in folklore, including their mischievous side, playing the role of cunning tricksters in Native American and Central African mythologies. (more…)

Read Full Post »

John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778. Image: Courtesy of National Gallery of Art, Washington

John Singleton Copley, Watson and the Shark, 1778. Image: Courtesy of National Gallery of Art, Washington

Artstor and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC have released more than 24,000 images from the museum’s collection in the Digital Library.

This release includes vast numbers of works of art by some of the most important artists from the 13th to 19th centuries. A partial list includes 36 works by Hans Baldung Grien, 10 works by Giovanni Bellini, 176 works by William Blake, five works by Pierre Bonnard, six works by Botticelli, 39 works by François Boucher, four works by Bronzino, 13 works by Julia Margaret Cameron, 96 works by Mary Cassatt, 292 works by Paul Cezanne, nine works by John Constable, 17 works by John Singleton Copley, 91 works by Corot, four works by Correggio, nine works by Gustave Courbet, 85 works by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 998 works by Honoré Daumier, 25 works by Jacques-Louis David, 106 works by Edgar Degas, 58 works by Eugène Delacroix, 354 works by Albrecht Dürer, 54 works by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, 15 works by Thomas Gainsborough, 159 works by Paul Gauguin, 39 works by Théodore Gericault, 20 works by Vincent Van Gogh, 38 works by Francisco de Goya, seven works by El Greco, eight works by Frans Hals, 88 works by William Hogarth, 61 works by Hans Holbein the Younger, 55 works by Winslow Homer, 25 works by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, four works by Leonardo Da Vinci, four works by Fra Filippo Lippi, 58 works by Edouard Manet, 12 works by Jean-François Millet, 21 works by Claude Monet, 25 works by Berthe Morisot, 37 works by Edvard Munch, 23 works by Eadweard Muybridge, 19 works by Parmigianino, 108 works by Giovanni Battista Piranesi, 59 works by Camille Pissarro, 12 works by Raphael, 90 works by Odilon Redon, 366 works by Rembrandt van Rijn, 55 works by Auguste Renoir, 35 works by Auguste Rodin, 21 Peter Paul Rubens, seven works by John Singer Sargent, five works by Georges Seurat, 52 works by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, twelve works by Jacopo Tintoretto, 12 works by Titian, 294 works by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 115 works by William Turner, eight works by Félix Vallotton, nine works by Veronese, 62 works by Edouard Vuillard, 17 works by Antoine Watteau, and 545 works by James McNeill Whistler.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

logo-arasArtstor is collaborating with the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism to release 17,000 images documenting mythology, symbols and rituals from different time periods and geographic locations in the Digital Library.

The images in Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (ARAS) explore the universality of certain iconographies and themes, illustrating commonalities in the ways human beings across the world have thought about and represented different phenomena. Each image includes commentary that points to its unique history and contextualizes it within larger patterns and historical developments. The collection supports interdisciplinary humanities research, research on the meaning of images in psychoanalysis and dreams, and provides support for designers searching for pictorial inspiration. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Antonio Canova, Pauline Bonaparte Borghese as Venus Victrix; detail of figure, Galleria Borghese. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.artres.com, scalarchives.com, (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE

Antonio Canova, Pauline Bonaparte Borghese as Venus Victrix; detail of figure, Galleria Borghese. Image and original data provided by SCALA, Florence/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.artres.com, scalarchives.com, (c) 2006, SCALA, Florence / ART RESOURCE

Antonio Canova began working on Pauline Bonaparte as Venus Victrix in 1805, the same year that Pope Pius VII appointed him Inspector General of Fine Arts and Antiquities for the Papal State. By this point, Canova’s reliance upon classical sources, idealized perfection of the forms, fluidity of line, graceful modeling, and exquisitely refined detail had solidly established his reputation as the preeminent sculptor in Europe.

Venus Victrix is an outstanding example of the neoclassical style, which was influenced by the archeological discoveries in Pompeii and Herculaneum and considered the works of the Greeks and Romans to be the pinnacle of artistic achievements. The life-sized reclining nude exemplifies Canova’s superlative technique; the modelling of the form is both idealized and extraordinarily realistic, while Canova’s treatment of the surface of the marble captures the soft texture of skin. This luster was enhanced through a patina of wax and acqua di rota, and it was once set upon a rotating mechanism, which allowed the static viewer to observe it from all angles.

Yet the sculpture’s owner, Prince Camillo Borghese, refused to allow the sculpture to be displayed and would only show it to close acquaintances by torchlight. How did this come to happen? (more…)

Read Full Post »

Joseph Beuys, Green Violin and Telephone S--------R (Sender--------Receiver), 1974

Joseph Beuys, Green Violin and Telephone S——–R (Sender——–Receiver), 1974. Image and original data provided by Yale University. ©2008 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Artstor is introducing curriculum guides–collections of images from the Artstor Digital Library based on syllabi for college courses–compiled by faculty members and experts around the country. Learn more here.

Survey of Western Art 2: Renaissance to Postmodern
Nancy Minty, Ph.D, Collections Editor, Artstor
This curriculum guide consists of a thorough overview of later western art (approximately 1300 through 2000 CE, completing the Survey of Western Art 1: Prehistoric to Gothic), presenting the cultural heritage of Europe and the New World with an emphasis on seminal works, including architecture, paintings and sculptures, manuscripts, prints, drawings and decorative arts, in addition to photography and installations. Students will hone visual and descriptive skills as they enhance their recognition of schools and styles, and, conversely, their awareness of breaks within the western tradition. Readings will be selected from survey texts as well as scholarly articles.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 637 other followers