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Archive for the ‘Sculpture & Installations’ Category

Brice Marden; The Seasons; 1974-1975. Image and original data provided by The Menil Collection, Houston; © 2014 Brice Marden / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden; The Seasons; 1974-1975. Image and original data provided by The Menil Collection, Houston; © 2014 Brice Marden / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Artstor and the Menil Foundation have just released nearly 200 images of highlights from the Menil Collection in the Digital Library.

The Menil Collection opened to the public in June 1987 to house, exhibit, and preserve the art collection of John and Dominique de Menil. Assembled over the course of many decades by the Houston philanthropists, the collection is recognized not only for its quality and depth but also for its distinctive presentation and eclecticism. An actively collecting institution, the Menil Collection contains diverse holdings representing many world cultures and thousands of years of human creativity, from prehistoric times to the present. Today, the collection comprises over 16,000 objects. (more…)

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Bhaja Caves, Caves 6 & 7; 2nd c. BCE-1st c. CE; Maharashtra, India. Image and original data provided by David Efurd © David Efurd

Bhaja Caves, Caves 6 & 7; 2nd c. BCE-1st c. CE; Maharashtra, India. Image and original data provided by David Efurd © David Efurd

Professor David Efurd’s collection of nearly 10,000 photographs of Buddhist, Hindu, and Jain art and architecture was recently released in the Artstor Digital Library. We were particularly impressed by the variety and complexity of the rock-cut cave temples he photographed, and he was kind enough to answer our questions.

Artstor: What is the importance of caves as the sites of some of these temples, as opposed to more typical, free-standing temples?

David Efurd: Regarding Buddhist caves, monks appear to have lived in natural caves and rock-shelters since the time of the Buddha. In fact, texts describe the Buddha as spending nights in caves at a variety of locations in northeastern India. Over time, simple shelters were enlarged by cutting away stone, and masonry walls may have been added to the front to make them more architectural.

In western India, these Buddhist sites are a bit later, perhaps dating from the second century BC at the earliest. Unlike the caves the Buddha lived in, they do not appear to be natural caves that were enlarged. Rather, they were carved deeply into outcroppings of stone or cliffs and tend to be architectonic, meaning that they resemble the interior spaces of architecture, despite being hewn into stone. Few free-standing buildings and monasteries from this period survive, so these caves provide crucial insight into a tradition of architecture that has all but disappeared. Rock-cut or cave architecture from this period draws upon both this early tradition of living in natural caves and the later monastic complexes consisting of residential buildings and places for instruction and worship. (more…)

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Benvenuto Cellini; Saliera (salt cellar), 1540-1543

Benvenuto Cellini; Saliera (salt cellar), 1540-1543; Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien. Image and original data provided by Erich Lessing Culture and Fine Arts Archives/ART RESOURCE, N.Y.; artres.com

Sculptor Benvenuto Cellini is best remembered for two things: his bombastic autobiography, the Vita, in which he confesses to multiple murders and a spectacular jailbreak, and for his salt cellar. Yes, that’s right—a dish for salt.

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Katsushika Hokusai, Under Mannen Bridge at Fukagawa, 1830-1831. Image and original data contributed by Hofstra University Museum

Artstor and the Hofstra University Museum have released approximately 200 images from the Museum’s permanent collection in the Digital Library.

Integral to the academic mission of Hofstra University, the Hofstra University Museum advances knowledge and understanding through experiences with authentic works of art from the world’s diverse cultures. The Museum’s mission is achieved through collection acquisition and preservation, exhibitions and interpretive resources. (more…)

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Tlingit artist, leggings, ca. 1880. Image and original data from Portland Art Museum.

Tlingit artist, leggings, ca. 1880. Image and original data from Portland Art Museum.

Artstor and the Portland Art Museum are now sharing more than 2,300 images of artworks, with a particular focus on Native American and Northwest art.

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David Wallace, Graces Can Be Grown, 2003. Exhibited at the Mattress Factory May 11 to July 15, 2003. Image and original data provided by Mattress Factory. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VISCOPY, Australia

David Wallace, Graces Can Be Grown, 2003. Exhibited at the Mattress Factory May 11 to July 15, 2003. Image and original data provided by Mattress Factory. © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VISCOPY, Australia

Artstor Digital Library and the Mattress Factory are now sharing more than 5,000 images documenting installations exhibited at the museum since its opening in 1977. This is the first release of a projected 12,000 images.

The Mattress Factory is a museum of contemporary art in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania that specializes in installations created on site by artists from all over the world. The museum’s unusual galleries are located in two creatively reused buildings on the city’s historic North Side. Both buildings house a growing permanent collection, featuring works by James Turrell, Yayoi Kusama, Winifred Lutz, and Rolf Julius, as well as periodical exhibitions.

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nyhsLogoArtstor and the New-York Historical Society are collaborating to release approximately 2,000 images of paintings and sculptures from the museum’s collection and 20,000 images from the library collection in the Digital Library.

The New-York Historical Society, comprising a library and museum, was founded in 1804. The museum, which is the oldest in the city, tells the history of New York and the United States through material culture and art. It has rich holdings in the decorative arts, painting, sculpture, and drawing, as well as a collection of assorted historical artifacts. Its art holdings consist of more than 1.6 million world-class works, including a collection of Hudson River School paintings, iconic genre and history paintings, a variety of American portraits, all 435 of John James Audubon’s extant preparatory watercolors for Birds of America, and 800 works of American representational sculpture. The museum also holds much of sculptor Elie Nadelman’s legendary American folk art collection, which includes furniture and household accessories, as well as paintings, toys, weathervanes, sculptural woodcarvings, and chalkware.

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